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Oppose.o

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Do I need to clean the valves/ lifters/ rods etc.? Car has been sitting for 20 years and they look a little gunked up. And if I do need to clean them, how would I do it?
 

Dodge33

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Do I need to clean the valves/ lifters/ rods etc.? Car has been sitting for 20 years and they look a little gunked up. And if I do need to clean them, how would I do it?

I believe it was my grandfather, that said in the olden days they would replace a quart of oil
with the use of a quart of diesel fuel. With the engines of the 60s-70s I don't know if this
would be acceptable. I am sure there our other members that will chime in also.
 

#41

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Do I need to clean the valves/ lifters/ rods etc.? Car has been sitting for 20 years and they look a little gunked up. And if I do need to clean them, how would I do it?
Once you break it lose and get it to turn over, try and get it started first. No need to clean valves/lifters/pushrods etc. They should be fine for a start up even with gunk plastered to them. After it starts and runs, then you can assess what is next.... run as is, clean stuff, partial rebuild, total rebuild, etc.

If it's been sitting for 20 years, you should probably take apart and clean the carb and run it off a gas can for the first start. The carb, gas tank, and gas lines are going to be gunked up with bad fuel. Once you get it to run off a gas can, then you will need to flush out the gas tank and fuel lines.
 

Oppose.o

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Once you break it lose and get it to turn over, try and get it started first. No need to clean valves/lifters/pushrods etc. They should be fine for a start up even with gunk plastered to them. After it starts and runs, then you can assess what is next.... run as is, clean stuff, partial rebuild, total rebuild, etc.

If it's been sitting for 20 years, you should probably take apart and clean the carb and run it off a gas can for the first start. The carb, gas tank, and gas lines are going to be gunked up with bad fuel. Once you get it to run off a gas can, then you will need to flush out the gas tank and fuel lines.
This is the state of the carb and that other piece that goes onto it ( I don't know what it is called). I'm guessing that I just need to get a new carb and a new intake manifold because both are very rusty and have been messed with by mice.
IMG_20220622_151843350.jpg


IMG_20220622_151819374.jpg
 

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IMHO, it's best to work with what you have for now. You don't even know if this engine is any good yet... so I wouldn't start a shopping list just yet. That carb looks pretty fair to me....pop it open carefully to save the gaskets, clean it out, reassemble, and use it as your starting point to try and fire the engine. For all you know, the engine has a cracked block, melted piston, or who knows what else. You don't want to start buying parts for it just yet if you don't have to.

It's very easy to fall into the habit of buying parts before you really know what you need or what your plan will be. Diagnose and repair first, buy parts later. Believe me.... I should have a much fatter bank account than I do!
 

RJRENTON

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IMHO, it's best to work with what you have for now. You don't even know if this engine is any good yet... so I wouldn't start a shopping list just yet. That carb looks pretty fair to me....pop it open carefully to save the gaskets, clean it out, reassemble, and use it as your starting point to try and fire the engine. For all you know, the engine has a cracked block, melted piston, or who knows what else. You don't want to start buying parts for it just yet if you don't have to.

It's very easy to fall into the habit of buying parts before you really know what you need or what your plan will be. Diagnose and repair first, buy parts later. Believe me.... I should have a much fatter bank account than I do!
IMO....the second pix appears to be the EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) valve, which is mounted on the linkage side of the carb and receives its opening vacuum from one of the carb's ported vacuum conbections. It must be in place b4 (but the vacuum line NOT connected) attempting to start the engine. The carb is a simple devices and and should be easily replaced with an auto parts store unit. BUT.....if you are considering a restored car, DO NOT let the carb go as a core....pay the core charge and condider having it restored by WOODRUF CARBS on this site....he offeres a discount....call him. ALSO, consider getting a FSM (Factory Service Manual) specific to your year, make and model of car.....its an invaluable source of information about everything about the car.....its available on line as a PDF.....can't remember the web site but someone will. Don't worry about the engines internal crud until you get it running....just make sure it has oil and coolant b4 starting. The '71 cars fo not have a complicated emission system. Since you have an EGR system, someone has changed intake manifold as the EGR system was not included until 1973 and later unless the car was origional built for California use as emissions were more stringent. Just talking out loud....
BOB RENTON
 

Oppose.o

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IMO....the second pix appears to be the EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) valve, which is mounted on the linkage side of the carb and receives its opening vacuum from one of the carb's ported vacuum conbections. It must be in place b4 (but the vacuum line NOT connected) attempting to start the engine. The carb is a simple devices and and should be easily replaced with an auto parts store unit. BUT.....if you are considering a restored car, DO NOT let the carb go as a core....pay the core charge and condider having it restored by WOODRUF CARBS on this site....he offeres a discount....call him. ALSO, consider getting a FSM (Factory Service Manual) specific to your year, make and model of car.....its an invaluable source of information about everything about the car.....its available on line as a PDF.....can't remember the web site but someone will. Don't worry about the engines internal crud until you get it running....just make sure it has oil and coolant b4 starting. The '71 cars fo not have a complicated emission system. Since you have an EGR system, someone has changed intake manifold as the EGR system was not included until 1973 and later unless the car was origional built for California use as emissions were more stringent. Just talking out loud....
BOB RENTON
So I do not need the EGR system? The car was definitely not built for cali so I have no clue why it has that.
 

#41

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So I do not need the EGR system? The car was definitely not built for cali so I have no clue why it has that.

No. You can block it off.
 

RJRENTON

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So I do not need the EGR system? The car was definitely not built for cali so I have no clue why it has that.
That depends.....does your state or municipality require emission testing to get a license plate? Most classic cars USUALLY DO NOT REQUIRE TESTING....but some do. Check .....
EGR systems help to reduce the Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx) by reducing combustion chamber temperature to less than 1500° F, by introducing exhaust gas in the fuel charge flowing into the combustion chamber.....very effective at controlling NOx.....but it kills the performance of the engine....gags and stumbles when cold, poor MPG. Should you eliminate the function? Your choice.
The engine MAY have been replaced along the line by a previous owner with a later model, 1973 and newer due to a major problem with the origional engine. If your restoring back to origional, you may have to source an engine of the year of the car. If not, it doesn't really matter.....but the EGR valve must be in place to close the manifold and exhaust ports. Put a small BB or split shot sinker in the vacuum hose and connect the valve....result....it looks correct, but the valve won't operate.....just a thought......
BOB RENTON
 

Rusty 72

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I agree with the above. Use what you have.
That carb may seem crusty but its better than anything you're gonna find on the local parts shelf right now. It's a simple 2 barrel just rebuild it.
Once you get it running pour some seafoam down it's gullet.
Good Luck!
 
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