Crappy BF Goodrich'

dadsbee

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Nothing new, they've been shit rubber that turns Brown since the late 70's... but just thought I'd show the difference between ONE year old Goodrich's and 32 year old Goodyears. Cleaned them both today with some naphtha. Not a hope in hell the BF's were even White to start with...
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4406bbl

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The newer tires have an antiozone added so they will turn brown, and last longer before cracking. It is a pain especially with white letters but all my Michelins are doing it too, non water base tire dressing also speeds it up. Not saying what to use just throwing it out there.
 

R413

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They are a bottom of the line tire, Cheap junk really. I don’t understand why they are on 90% of the classic cars.
 

4406bbl

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They are a bottom of the line tire, Cheap junk really. I don’t understand why they are on 90% of the classic cars.

Because they look right, just like polyglass gt, not good but they look right.
 

moparedtn

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Oh I dunno about all that with the BFG's...
Fred's are at least a dozen years old and they came fairly white when I cleaned them:

I'm more concerned with their age than anything else - they still drive great.
 

MIKESPOLARA

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MoparLeo

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Those Goodyear tires are closer to 40 + years old.
Why do people buy the BFG ? Simple. You have always been able to buy BFG T/A tires non stop since the 70's and they are radial tires.
The tire hit the skids when Michelin purchased BFG and Uniroyal in the 80's. They started to use the cheaper Uniroyal steel belted green tire and put it in the BFG tire mold. Uniroyal inside, BFG outside. Lower quality tire.
Bias/belted Polyglas GT tire was discontinued in the late 70's.
Now only high dollar reproductions available.
Just like originals, hard ride, poor traction.
 

toolmanmike

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Nothing new, they've been shit rubber that turns Brown since the late 70's... but just thought I'd show the difference between ONE year old Goodrich's and 32 year old Goodyears. Cleaned them both today with some naphtha. Not a hope in hell the BF's were even White to start with...
View attachment 1268805 View attachment 1268806 View attachment 1268807 View attachment 1268808 View attachment 1268809
Like normal. https://www.forabodiesonly.com/mopa...ters-turn-brown.424615/page-2#post-1972339634
 

69L48Z27

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Browning of White Sidewall Letters
BFGoodrich® tire designs include protective agents to retard the natural degradation of the rubber over time, which can occur when exposed to the sun and to ozone present in the air. These protective agents are designed to slowly migrate to the surface over time in order to provide continual protection over the intended lifespan of the tire. Under normal circumstances the protectants are not noticeable on black rubber or on white rubber. However, under certain circumstances, these protective agents may become noticeable over time as yellowing or browning due to interaction with ozone. The contrast may be most notable on white rubber. Discoloration of the white rubber is not a warrantable condition.
At the same time, exposure to sunlight has a beneficial effect on the appearance of the white rubber. The micro-thin outer surface of the white rubber is designed to photo-oxidize when exposed to sunlight. Rain, car washing and even the flexing of a rolling tire will progressively remove these oxidized particles from the white rubber. As particles of the micro-surface layer are removed, new white rubber is revealed. The white rubber of tires on vehicles that are garaged or protected from regular sunlight exposure are not allowed to oxidize or to refresh their surface appearance as designed. As a result, the migration of protectants can become visible over time on tires not exposed to sunlight
Tire sidewalls or letters which have become dull due to dirt or similar buildup can be cleaned with mild soap and water. Should discoloration from migration of protective agents occur, regular exposure to sunlight will refresh the white rubber. If regular exposure to sunlight isn’t possible or practical, the following hand cleaning methods could be employed:
Cleaning Option 1: Use common steel wool soap pads (such as Brillo or S.O.S. brands) with water on the white rubber to gently remove surface discoloration until the white color is restored. Be sure to rinse thoroughly to remove any remaining cleaning particles.

Cleaning Option 2: Use wet sanding paper (400 grit) with water and mild soap on the white rubber to gently remove surface discoloration until the white color is restored. Be sure to rinse thoroughly to remove any remaining cleaning particles.
BFGoodrich® Tires does not recommend any powered cleaning methods, either by mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, etc. For additional information, please contact your local BFGoodrich® sales representative or contact BFGoodrich® using the website at www.bfgoodrichtires.com
MNA, Inc. • One Parkway South, P.O. Box 19001 • Greenville, South Carolina 29602 – 9001
 

MoparLeo

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Didn't sell them in 1990 as a new Goodyear manufactured tire. Check the DOT codes on the tires.
I started working for major tire companies in 1973. Retired from Bridgestone/Firestone in 2007.
 

moparedtn

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Near the bottom. Have not tried it yet. https://www.bfgoodrichtires.com/assistance/faq
From that FAQ:
"Browning of White Sidewall Letters
BFGoodrich® tire designs include protective agents to retard the natural degradation of the rubber over
time, which can occur when exposed to the sun and to ozone present in the air.
These protective agents are designed to slowly migrate to the surface over time in order to provide
continual protection over the intended lifespan of the tire.
Under normal circumstances the protectants are not noticeable on black rubber or on white rubber.

However, under certain circumstances, these protective agents may become noticeable over time as
yellowing or browning due to interaction with ozone. The contrast may be most notable on white rubber.
Discoloration of the white rubber is not a warrantable condition.

At the same time, exposure to sunlight has a beneficial effect on the appearance of the white rubber.
The micro-thin outer surface of the white rubber is designed to photo-oxidize when exposed to sunlight.
Rain, car washing and even the flexing of a rolling tire will progressively remove these oxidized particles
from the white rubber. As particles of the micro-surface layer are removed, new white rubber is revealed.
The white rubber of tires on vehicles that are garaged or protected from regular sunlight exposure are
not allowed to oxidize or to refresh their surface appearance as designed.
As a result, the migration of protectants can become visible over time on tires not exposed to sunlight.

Tire sidewalls or letters which have become dull due to dirt or similar buildup can be cleaned with mild
soap and water. Should discoloration from migration of protective agents occur, regular exposure to
sunlight will refresh the white rubber.
If regular exposure to sunlight isn’t possible or practical, the following hand cleaning methods could be
employed:

Cleaning Option 1: Use common steel wool soap pads (such as Brillo or S.O.S. brands) with water on
the white rubber to gently remove surface discoloration until the white color is restored.
Be sure to rinse thoroughly to remove any remaining cleaning particles.

Cleaning Option 2: Use wet sanding paper (400 grit) with water and mild soap on the white rubber
to gently remove surface discoloration until the white color is restored. Be sure to rinse thoroughly
to remove any remaining cleaning particles.

BFGoodrich® Tires does not recommend any powered cleaning methods, either by mechanical,
hydraulic, pneumatic, etc. For additional information, please contact your local BFGoodrich® sales
representative or contact BFGoodrich® using the website at www.bfgoodrichtires.com"
 

bc3j

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As an experiment, I took my Radial TAs off and put on Vitour RWL V rated tires. They’re 235/60-15. So far only about 800 miles on them so the jury is still out. Right now, so far so good. The letters are still white.
 

Ron H

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From that FAQ:
"Browning of White Sidewall Letters
BFGoodrich® tire designs include protective agents to retard the natural degradation of the rubber over
time, which can occur when exposed to the sun and to ozone present in the air.
These protective agents are designed to slowly migrate to the surface over time in order to provide
continual protection over the intended lifespan of the tire.
Under normal circumstances the protectants are not noticeable on black rubber or on white rubber.

However, under certain circumstances, these protective agents may become noticeable over time as
yellowing or browning due to interaction with ozone. The contrast may be most notable on white rubber.
Discoloration of the white rubber is not a warrantable condition.

At the same time, exposure to sunlight has a beneficial effect on the appearance of the white rubber.
The micro-thin outer surface of the white rubber is designed to photo-oxidize when exposed to sunlight.
Rain, car washing and even the flexing of a rolling tire will progressively remove these oxidized particles
from the white rubber. As particles of the micro-surface layer are removed, new white rubber is revealed.
The white rubber of tires on vehicles that are garaged or protected from regular sunlight exposure are
not allowed to oxidize or to refresh their surface appearance as designed.
As a result, the migration of protectants can become visible over time on tires not exposed to sunlight.

Tire sidewalls or letters which have become dull due to dirt or similar buildup can be cleaned with mild
soap and water. Should discoloration from migration of protective agents occur, regular exposure to
sunlight will refresh the white rubber.
If regular exposure to sunlight isn’t possible or practical, the following hand cleaning methods could be
employed:

Cleaning Option 1: Use common steel wool soap pads (such as Brillo or S.O.S. brands) with water on
the white rubber to gently remove surface discoloration until the white color is restored.
Be sure to rinse thoroughly to remove any remaining cleaning particles.

Cleaning Option 2: Use wet sanding paper (400 grit) with water and mild soap on the white rubber
to gently remove surface discoloration until the white color is restored. Be sure to rinse thoroughly
to remove any remaining cleaning particles.

BFGoodrich® Tires does not recommend any powered cleaning methods, either by mechanical,
hydraulic, pneumatic, etc. For additional information, please contact your local BFGoodrich® sales
representative or contact BFGoodrich® using the website at www.bfgoodrichtires.com"
Read this somewhere just recently..
 
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