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Dry start engine oil priming

rgx

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Is there a way to prime the 1970 440 without going the distributor route?

Because it sits for extended periods, I will like to be able to prime the oiling system without having to take the distributor out each time.

Can you prime via the oil pressure socket or the inlet tube of a oil filter sandwich plate with a accumulator or oil gear pump where the oil comes from plumbing of the oil pan to feed it.

Thanks in advance.
 
My alternative, you won't like this either, to pull the spark plugs, to relieve load on the rods and mains. Just start it, or pull the distributor.
 
Can you prime via the oil pressure socket or the inlet tube of a oil filter sandwich plate with a accumulator or oil gear pump where the oil comes from plumbing of the oil pan to feed it.

Yes. An accusump would be your best option.
 
Some of it depends on your storage location. Ideally it's pretty dry with no big temperature and humidity fluctuations.
They can sit for long periods but long cranking without starting is not a good thing.
I run mine a good while 1/2 hour or more before storing and cap off the exhuast and intake with rags and a sheet of plastic over the carb.

I would prime the carb, dump a couple tablespoons down there and fire it quickly run it around 1,500 rpm or more for a little bit.
 
What about an accumulator, shut it off when engine running. Shut engine down. When you go to start it open up accumulator prime engine. Pricy solution!
 
New engine or well "varnished" time piece. The engine in my Bee was rebuilt in 1978 for 300 bucks. I have never primed it before start, even after it sat 14 years in my marine container before I restored it. Still runs like a swiss watch...
 
My design of the system I want to try is below,
Do anyone is a flaw in my thoughts of the system.

17138923348364619757701640471843.jpg
 
My design of the system I want to try is below,
Do anyone is a flaw in my thoughts of the system.
Only flaw I see is its unnecessary.
Do a poll of how many guys on here use an accumulator on anything other than an 800hp drag engine.
 
Is the OP an engineer?

01 face 1.jpg


I think you're probably overthinking this. I have cars that sit for awhile too. It doesn't hurt the engine, it does gunk up the fuel system though.
 
My design of the system I want to try is below,
Do anyone is a flaw in my thoughts of the system.

View attachment 1651913
More work to make your rig than pulling dist.
How to pull and put back your distributor to prime engine.
1. Pull cap, take picture so you can see where rotor is pointing.
2. Clean base of distributor and block in a place you can reach. Take a 1/4" wide 1" or so, put the so it goes from base to block.
3. Slice the tape between distributor base and block so one piece of tape stays with distributor and one to the block. This is so when you put distributor back in you align the tape up so your timing is the same as before.
4. Remove distributor. Take a picture of your distributor drive so when you put it back it is in the same position. Prime your engine! 5. Put your distributor drive back in where it was.
If you need to move it use a large screwdriver turning it CCW until it is where it was before.
6. Put your distributor back in with rotor as in was before. ALIGN tape so your timing is as it was.
If you turn the engine at all you'll go through the BS because of turning engine.
 
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Then there is nothing to be concerned about with the clicking of the valves until the hydraulic lifters pump themselves by up.

Cost wise is about the same as the accusump system.

Was worried about hurting the cam on the startups.

Thanks everyone for you input, much appreciated.
 
Is the OP an engineer?

View attachment 1651966

I think you're probably overthinking this. I have cars that sit for awhile too. It doesn't hurt the engine, it does gunk up the fuel system though.
It can hurt the engine around here.
One week it's 30 degrees and suddenly it's 60 and raining.
You open the door to an unheated space and everything turns wet from the condensation.
And I mean EVERYTHING!
Any open valves can get rust spots (that's why I recommend capping off the engine openings).
Luckily we can get ethanol free gas here so that's what I run.
I'll use regular in my 1993 Dakota up until fall then run a tank of E-free before that one get's parked for winter.
So far, so good...
 
I installed an accumulator on my car a long time ago. I have it wired into the ignition system with a switch so I can turn it on or off. I flip the switch on before cranking the engine so it has 25 or 30 psi and then I hit the starter. It takes some effort to install but I like having one.
 
I installed an accumulator on my car a long time ago. I have it wired into the ignition system with a switch so I can turn it on or off. I flip the switch on before cranking the engine so it has 25 or 30 psi and then I hit the starter. It takes some effort to install but I like having one.
Did you plum the pressure in/out hose via a oil pressure plug on the top back of the motor or a oil filter sandwich plate?
 
Engine block has a large port above the bellhousing that feeds the main gallery. That is where the Accusump is connected.

DSC_3440 (Large).JPG
 
I just pump all the oil into the gallery with a plastic weed sprayer on new engines or old that have sat awhile.
I like KISS solutions.
 
My racecar runs a Master Lube. Welcome to MasterLube.net It gets primed on EVERY start. The best you can do with an engine that sets is to make sure it fires instantly w/o a lot of cranking. I fill the bowls on the carb with an old mustard bottle thru the vents. imsdiatly after starting keep the rpms up at 2500 or so for a few minutes to get a lot of oil splash. Cranking to gain oil pressure is not a good way to do it. the best thing next to an accumultor is to pull th edistributor. That being said my street stuff sets in hibernation over the winter. The carb bowl fill method has proven flawless. Both motors have been together forover 20 years.
Doug
 
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