lugnut torque with Aluminum wheels

Tires and Wheels (Mopar Hubcaps Too)

  1. road chicken

    road chicken Active Member

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    Wondering what torque to use on a 71 b with Al wheels. The 1/2-20 stud dictates 65 lbf/ft and that's what the Bible says for the factory steel. However everytime i see Al wheels it's @100 lbf/ft. Even on my 94 Voyager with the same stud. Is more torque needed with the wider seating area on the Al wheels
    Curious as to what youse guys is running and why
     
  2. 1967coronet440

    1967coronet440 FBBO Gold Member FBBO Gold Member

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    Which wheels are they, usually the manufacturer will have specs for them
     
  3. road chicken

    road chicken Active Member

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    They are Hurst wheels. I asked them and they came back with a torque based on the proper load for the 1/2-20 stud 65 lbf-ft.
     
  4. 69L48Z27

    69L48Z27 FBBO Gold Member FBBO Gold Member

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    My spec has always been 80 Ftlbs on aluminum wheels.
     
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    • khryslerkid

      khryslerkid FBBO Gold Member FBBO Gold Member

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      Whatever the torque you go with, it's always a good idea with any aluminium wheel to re torque them after a drive.
       
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      • MoparLeo

        MoparLeo NRA PATRON LEVEL LIFE MEMBER FBBO Gold Member

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        Go with the wheel manufacturers recommendation, not your opinion. They have a vested interest in the wheel not coming off and some one getting injured. Get the info from their website or tech dept. Not the guy at the tire shop. There are many different types of lug nut types and wheel lug-seat designs. Some rims use a steel seat insert, some just machined. Some are heat treated. Point is that they are all unique to the wheel manufacturer and their own engineered design. The FSM is for OEM wheels only. No matter the end result it is prudent to recheck wheel lug torque after 100 miles to make sure that the aluminum had not compressed under load or that the heat/cool cycle of the alloy rim has not allowed the lugnut to loosen. Torque is just a measurement of the tension(stretch) on the studs. Be it a rod bolt, main/head stud etc...
         
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        • road chicken

          road chicken Active Member

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          I understand all that, but it still leaves me wondering why the exact same stud will garner a 65 ftlb on a steel wheels and 100 + on an aluminum, even when the stud is rated to 65 ftlbs. The guy at Hurst just looked up what the rating was for the stud. Some kid in tech support that had to look up the stud rating doesn't give me alot of confidence that they thought this through. I thought there may be more to it as the seating area on a steel wheels is pretty thin vs aluminum wheels seating area. (Weld wheel has a recommended 80-100 lbft for the 1/2-20 stud with their wheels.) The fatter seating area will offer more rotational resistance before the bolt reaches it's designed load point / stretch.
          Thensame with the minivan with M12x1.50 studs. Rated for 30-40 lbft but the manual calls for 100.
          I guessing these higher numbers were generated by tightenimg the assembly and the measuring what it took to get the bolt stretch / clamping force required. I'm pretty sure Hurst didn't do that , or it sure didn't strike me as the did. The 80 lbft is a good compromise as that is the dry stud torque for the 1/2 - 20 stud. I'll start there and see how it goes.
           
          Last edited: Oct 10, 2019 at 7:37 AM
        • Darter6

          Darter6 FBBO Gold Member FBBO Gold Member

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          I believe American Racing Wheels has a chart. I agree with khryslerkid. I too do 80 lbs and check them several times after installation. Only once did we loose a wheel,the studs weren't fully seated in the new axles we installed in a 'Cuda.:(
           
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