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Possibly a dumb ? But...Wilwood 4 wheel disc brake system and factory hard lines??

biomedtechguy

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It was suggested that I replace my factory hard brake lines with new stainless steel hard lines. I believe that I'm getting what I need to match up the factory brake lines with the Wilwood brakes within these parts??
Front:
15" Front Flex Lines AN-3 Size
Hard line conversion fittings in 3/8IF and 7/16IF
Male/Male AN-3 to 1/8" NPT for calipers
Rear:
15" Drop line AN-3
3/8 IF and 7/16 IF hard line conversion fittings
Simple AN-3 T Fitting
(2) 30" AN-3 lines to span the rear end
Male/Male AN-3 to 1/8" NPT for calipers

So I'm guessing that I should just buy a complete line set to replace my factory lines, and the Wilwood parts in red will match everything together?
 
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Contact Wilwood for advice? Dunno why it wouldn't work. I've used adapter fittings before to put a 69 A body master on my 66 Belvedere.....
 
Contact Wilwood for advice?
Well, I didn't try that, but I did speak with 2 people at Inline Tube. The first one couldn't wait 5 or 10 seconds for me to step outside/or hit the speaker off button because he had trouble hearing me clearly, and the 2nd person told me they only had factory style brake lines and those wouldn't work with Wilwood, and they didn't have anything they could sell me....
I told him if I wasn't changing out my factory original brake lines that I would be able to hook up the brakes, and I just wanted new lines in stainless steel to replace the ones I had.
I gave up at that point, seeing their sale was good Monday too. That way I can talk with a couple of people or get a response on this thread, so I can call an "order taker" back at Inline Tube and tell them what I need.
 
here is the difference and my experience between
the regular brake lines vs the stainless brake lines
and from where I live
I think I have replaced my share of lines
some in not easy places..
dozens or more... lol

the stainless lines use fittings that are a slightly different thread pitch from factory fittings
meaning they are just a little off going into certain things like Tees
on a rear end and other places making it harder to seal those places up
so to make up for that
you need to almost over tighten the **** out them and you will sometimes be chasing more leaks, cranking down on **** too much
Just a pita
been there done that seen them rot just as fast as anything else.
Imo
Waste of money

as the regular lines have much less of that issue.
I like reusing the old fittings on almost everything as even new regular fittings will leak and I have cut them off and put the old fittings back on many times

the brake lines they make today are softer and more forgiving then ever
I just use the regular lines myself, stainless is over kill to me and a pita
I end up making my own a lot
as many older vehicles that are 20 plus years old
in these parts need a brake/ fuel line or 2 replaced to keep them going
and they don't make those parts.

fine lines makes some good prebent (I see them at Carlisle show)
or go make the damn thing yourself.
got my old school flaring tool and a few benders and a tube cutter
and get the f out of my way..
 
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Wilwood brakes don’t need stainless. Regular steel is fine. You fronts shouldn’t need any alteration, flex line connects at factory location. Rear discs are different story. You’ll need to shorten and flare the rears to incorporate the flex lines to the rear calipers. Wilwoods are a fixed caliper but I would use flex lines so you don’t need to up hook the line for servicing.
 
Rear discs are different story. You’ll need to shorten and flare the rears to incorporate the flex lines to the rear calipers. Wilwoods are a fixed caliper but I would use flex lines so you don’t need to up hook the line for servicing.
I have THIS (see below quote) for the rear. Is what you are posting that I quoted still valid? It's a stock Dana 60. I also just had the "junction block w/rubber hose and breather" assembly on the rear end replaced the 1st week of October, if that matters.
(2) 30" AN-3 lines to span the rear end
Male/Male AN-3 to 1/8" NPT for calipers
 
I personally wouldn’t use that long of flex line. I missed that the first read through. It’ll work, I just prefer to run hard line as far as possible.

The last drum car I converted from drum to disc in the rear, I cut the factory line right on the in board side of the u-bolts. I added a 90* bracket that had an AN to flare adapter, I drilled and tapped a small bolt bolt in the axle for the 90* bracket. I don’t recall the exact length of the flex line but it was probably around 8”.
 
I'll never waste the extra money on stainless lines again. Put a set on for a customer couple years back. Had the exact trouble with the fitting from a above post. Regular lines lasted on my car this long in the south I will be putting regular steel lines on mine and letting someone esle worry about the lines in 50 more years.
I've installed several wilwood kits for customers. In every occasion their kits have included parts to get from their calipers to the factory hard mounts.
 
It was suggested that I replace my factory hard brake lines with new stainless steel hard lines. I believe that I'm getting what I need to match up the factory brake lines with the Wilwood brakes within these parts??
Who suggested this and why? Are the factory lines in good condition or do they need replacing? I run 4 wheel Wilwood discs with the original factory lines.
 
Didn't know the SS lines were that way. Never worked with them but bought a kit for my Belvedere 20 years ago.....
 
Who suggested this and why? Are the factory lines in good condition or do they need replacing?
A forum member, as part of a broader post. I'm replacing everything else, so it was a "might as well go ahead and....." suggestion that was made.
I haven't inspected them lately. I have had a recurring soft pedal issue that no one seems to be able to permanently fix, so I don't know if lines have anything to do with that, but I doubt it.
 
I have had a recurring soft pedal issue that no one seems to be able to permanently fix, so I don't know if lines have anything to do with that, but I doubt it.

slight chance it could be caused by flex lines
zero chance caused by hard lines..
 
A forum member, as part of a broader post. I'm replacing everything else, so it was a "might as well go ahead and....." suggestion that was made.
I haven't inspected them lately. I have had a recurring soft pedal issue that no one seems to be able to permanently fix, so I don't know if lines have anything to do with that, but I doubt it.
If the original lines need replacing, go for it. I guess if I replaced anything it would be the original rubber lines with AN braided lines. Might help stiffen up that pedal some.
 
I personally wouldn’t use that long of flex line. I missed that the first read through. It’ll work, I just prefer to run hard line as far as possible.
I wouldn’t either. In fact, I didn’t use any at all on the rear. Wilwoods are a fixed caliper, as mentioned, and replacing the pads doesn’t even require caliper removal.
 
I am the member who suggested he replace the 50 year old hard lines since he said the reason he replaced the rubber line in the rear was it was gummed up causing a problem with the flow. As he was going for the bling factor I suggested using SS lines. I hope none of you guys are using 50 year old brake lines. Especially, rubber lines.

According to Inline Tube, the SS lines need to be tightened, loosened and re-tightened to get them to seat properly. I have no leaks with that method, including SS flex lines and hard lines.

The lines are plumbed different from the master cylinder downward with a Wilwood set-up than the way they are now. Make sure they provide you with the specs on what yo need or if your kit comes with pre-bent lines with fittings.
 
I am the member who suggested he replace the 50 year old hard lines since he said the reason he replaced the rubber line in the rear was it was gummed up causing a problem with the flow. As he was going for the bling factor I suggested using SS lines. I hope none of you guys are using 50 year old brake lines. Especially, rubber lines.

According to Inline Tube, the SS lines need to be tightened, loosened and re-tightened to get them to seat properly. I have no leaks with that method, including SS flex lines and hard lines.

The lines are plumbed different from the master cylinder downward with a Wilwood set-up than the way they are now. Make sure they provide you with the specs on what yo need or if your kit comes with pre-bent lines with fittings.
If so, that makes perfect sense. I suppose if someone mixed all kinds of brake fluid they could have created something to gum up a line but in my experience, it’s usually a hose deteriorating that causes that condition. Using 50 year old steel lines isn’t a problem if they’re in good shape. Using 50 year old rubber lines is just plain asking for trouble.
 
According to Inline Tube, the SS lines need to be tightened, loosened and re-tightened to get them to seat properly. I have no leaks with that method, including SS flex lines and hard lines.
Great advice! :thumbsup:
the reason he replaced the rubber line in the rear was it was gummed up causing a problem with the flow
Correct! I had the best brakes, ever, for a couple of days, after that "junction block rubber hose breather" was replaced, then the pedal began to get progressively softer, and closer to the floor.
The lines are plumbed different from the master cylinder downward with a Wilwood set-up than the way they are now. Make sure they provide you with the specs on what yo need or if your kit comes with pre-bent lines with fittings.
That's what I'm trying to do, as part of this process.
When the shop installed the Quick Performance 9" rear axle assembly in the 65 GTO, I had them install a Wilwood 4 wheel disc brake system, and line lock. I remember choosing and ordering the chrome plated power brake booster and line lock, but I didn't play an active role in any of the brake line logistics. It turned out great:
20180921_160629.jpg
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20180926_132937.jpg
20180926_132946.jpg
20190628_112918.jpg
20180926_133846.jpg
 
If you haven't spent the money yet then just buy reproduction steel lines. The SST lines are hard to work with and you might end up with leaks that you can't get rid of.
The hard lines have nothing to do with the Wilwood calipers. You just need the correct adapters on each end to convert from hard line to AN. If you haven't purchased the Wilwood calipers yet then I'd highly recommend using a higher quality caliper. Baer makes really nice kits or look at what Doctor Diff has for sale. The only vendor I use on my own cars is Brembo but I've used Baer on customer cars. I'd never install Wilwood brakes on my own car.
DSC_3613 (Large).JPG
 
If you haven't spent the money yet then just buy reproduction steel lines. The SST lines are hard to work with and you might end up with leaks that you can't get rid of.
I haven't bought anything yet. I agree re: regular lines vs stainless. I avoid rainy day driving, and I live and drive in the south, so no salted road driving. I definitely don't want any leaks!! As far as I know, there's nothing wrong with the lines I have, but I am getting all new everything else, so I thought changing the lines might be a good idea.
The hard lines have nothing to do with the Wilwood calipers. You just need the correct adapters on each end to convert from hard line to AN.
Adapters and stainless steel braided flex lines are included as follows:
Front:
15" Front Flex Lines AN-3 Size
Hard line conversion fittings in 3/8IF and 7/16IF
Male/Male AN-3 to 1/8" NPT for calipers
Rear:
15" Drop line AN-3
3/8 IF and 7/16 IF hard line conversion fittings
Simple AN-3 T Fitting
(2) 30" AN-3 lines to span the rear end
Male/Male AN-3 to 1/8" NPT for calipers
I'm also having a line lock installed, so that is going to take a little line fab anyway.
The shop that did the rear axle assembly and Wilwood 4 wheel disc brakes on the GTO did a nice job:
20180921_160634.jpg
20180921_160629.jpg

If you haven't purchased the Wilwood calipers yet then I'd highly recommend using a higher quality caliper.
Andy, I value your experience and advice. I already paid for them, and all 4 are SIX piston calipers, if that matters. No problem with the Wilwood brakes on the GTO so far either.
Baer makes really nice kits
I looked at Baer, but I couldn't find anything for my car. Looking again, I see a Baer 13" kit, 6 piston calipers for OEM disc brake spindles which Dr Diff sells reproduction disc brake spindles, whereas I have to use original (no one makes new ones) DRUM brake spindles. That would have cost around $2,200 PLUS the master cylinder cost, whatever that is, and that leaves the rear brakes to buy at $1,200.
I was able to take advantage of a favor owed to me and get 12.88" fronts, 12.19" rear, all drilled and slotted, and the Wilwood master cylinder for around $2,400, including the corner and rear lines and adapters I listed.
 
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