Soldering Butt Connectors

Electrical & Ignition

  1. 72 Satellite

    72 Satellite Well-Known Member

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    Hello All,

    I'm in the process of refurbishing my Dash harness, and following the MAD instructions on bypassing the ammeter.

    My question concerns soldering the butt connectors. I'm amateurish at best when it comes to soldering, so forgive my ignorance.

    Has anyone had success using an iron or gun vs a torch? It seems a tall task to this amateur, in getting 10 awg leads and the butt connector hot enough.

    On the same subject, has anyone had success using the "heat shrink self solder" connectors?

    I'm leaning towards the non insulated butt connectors, followed by high quality heat shrink, no soldering...

    Before I proceed, thought I would tap the vast knowledge present in this forum, as it's proven a very wise decision in the past.

    Thanks in advance for any and all help.

    Rob
     
  2. 69Bee

    69Bee FBBO Gold Member FBBO Gold Member

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    Do it right, no gimmicks. Buy or borrow a soldering gun 125W, rosin core solder, and a pack of heat shrink tubes. Put the heat shrink (cut to desired size) on the wire, solder the lug on, slide the heat shrink into place and use a lighter to shrink it. Try not to catch it on fire, just wave the flame over it quickly until it stops shrinking.
     
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    • RJRENTON

      RJRENTON FBBO Gold Member FBBO Gold Member

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      IMO....
      ABSOLUTELY the correct method....no gimmicks or "just as good as" methods. Use the above outlined method to achieve excellent connectivity.
      BOB RENTON
       
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      • funknut

        funknut Well-Known Member

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        When starting soldering it's sometimes quite hard to get everything to sit in place when you're dealing with wires, soldering iron solder, etc. Consider getting some 'helping hands' to keep stuff in place and let you focus on just the iron and solder.

        https://www.amazon.com/helping-hands/s?k=helping+hands
         
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        • Nevada dan

          Nevada dan Well-Known Member

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          if you have access to a heat gun they work better on the heat shrink tubing ,and get hot enough to melt the solder in the connectors with solder witch have a heavier outer shield then most heat shrink tubing
           
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          • threewood

            threewood FBBO Gold Member FBBO Gold Member

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            Place shrink tube on wire, stab ends together, wrap with strand of wire, heat joint until solder flows into joint. I use a soldering iron I bought on Amazon.
            20201222_131700.jpg 20201222_131642.jpg
             
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            • bee71

              bee71 Well-Known Member

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              Or cut two slits in an aerosol cap.
              th?id=OP.JX4DVD%2fvhre0yQ474C474&w=160&h=220&rs=1&o=5&pid=21.jpg
               
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              • slepr1

                slepr1 Well-Known Member

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                Do a search on 'crimp vs soldering wires' and in the gold standard is proper crimping (get a good crimper). I've seen several reasons from wire fatigue to solder recrystallization to tin (the main component of most solder) has about 5 times the resistance of copper. I researched this when I was installing my stereo system in my car and was about to solder everything. Glad I didn't.

                https://monroeengineering.com/blog/...r, more reliable,cause the connection to fail.

                https://millennialdiyer.com/articles/motorcycles/electrical-repair-crimp-or-solder/

                https://www.reichelt.com/magazin/en/crimping-vs-soldering/
                 
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                • 747mopar

                  747mopar FBBO Gold Member FBBO Gold Member

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                  One thing to keep in mind is that stranded copper wire is used in automobiles because it can withstand the vibrations, careless soldering can wick up the wire turning inches of it solid.
                   
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                  • RemCharger

                    RemCharger Well-Known Member

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                    Agreed. Mechanical connection is best. Have fought electrical issues from soldering before. Not fun.
                     
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                    • RJRENTON

                      RJRENTON FBBO Gold Member FBBO Gold Member

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                      An additional method (to that shown in #6) I've used previously, is thru the use of UN INSULATED crimp-on parallel butt connectors. Ive aquired an AMP ratcheting "W" crimp tool that works very well. The exposed conductor are shorter than those in #6 pix. Slip on a piece of appropriately sized shrink tubing over the wire b4 crimping, crimp on the butt connector, solder it to the wire using a ROSIN flux electrical grade 50/50 tin lead solder and either a soldering iron or a Weller type soldering gun (125 watts), heat the joint, apply the solder, allowing it to flow sparingly into the joint, remove the heat source, allow the joint to cool, slide the heat shrink tubing over the soldered connection, apply heat to shrink the tubing....job done. The connection is permanent with as much conductivity as the wire itself.
                      upload_2021-4-20_10-55-35.png

                      upload_2021-4-20_10-57-45.png

                      Just my opinion of course.
                      BOB RENTON
                       
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                      • Charged440

                        Charged440 Well-Known Member

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                        I recently used two pieces of clay to hold the wires steady, worked like a charm.
                         
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                        • LowBikeMike

                          LowBikeMike Well-Known Member

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                          I'm in the no solder camp on stranded wires. A good crimping tool is the most important part. A good crimping tool will eliminate a crushed, not crimped connector and yield a good tight connection. Get the right tool for the job.

                          Wirefy makes some good heat shrink butt connectors also.
                           
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                          • 69Bee

                            69Bee FBBO Gold Member FBBO Gold Member

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                            I disagree with all of these articles on substance. First, to your point and the second article, normal "old school" solder which is PbSn solder 63%Lead and 37%Tin, has slightly less resistivity than copper. I did not look up the resistivity of current RoHS "Lead Free" solder which I know is harder to use due to the higher tin content.

                            Resistance of Solder Joints - RC Groups: Here are some values for the materials of interest:
                            copper - resitivity=1.68E-8 ohm-m (0.0000000168)
                            typical eutectic PbSn solder (63% lead, 37% tin) - resitivity=1.65E-7 ohm-m

                            Next, a properly soldered joint will last a long time, and won't allow contaminants into the joint. I have seen "Cold" solder joints, but they are usually rare. Now, in total disagreement with all three articles, a crimped joint is neither "gas tight" or sealed. In an outside environment, moisture WILL wick into the joint causing corrosion, higher resistance, and eventually a failed joint. As far as mechanical fatigue, either joint can fail with enough movement, and if a crimped joint can move as referred to in one article, that is a failed joint waiting to happen due to a higher joint resistance. If the crimped wire can move, it will have a higher joint resistance. The crimped examples in the articles were also factory crimps, and will definitely surpass any crimped joint done in the field, and done by the dyi'er.

                            In conclusion, any joint can fail due to corrosion, weak joint (mechanical or bad soldering), external forces. A properly applied joint soldered or crimped should last. Also, all soldered or crimped joints should be properly sealed to the environment to prevent failure, which will eventually happen.
                             
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                            • BeepBeepRR

                              BeepBeepRR FBBO Gold Member FBBO Gold Member

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                              • 72 Satellite

                                72 Satellite Well-Known Member

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                                Thank you all for the input.

                                I should have been more specific in my question, and my soldering experience.

                                In the past I've been successful soldering 2 pieces of stranded copper together.

                                What I'm NOT familiar with is soldering a 10awg splice with non-insulated butt connectors.

                                I looked for and couldn't find any video's showing a demonstration with that gauge wire and butt connectors...

                                Have any of you sucessfully done EXACTLY as the MAD ammeter Bypass article suggests???

                                And if so, what were your steps and soldering equipment involved.

                                Thanks again.

                                Rob
                                 
                              • 747mopar

                                747mopar FBBO Gold Member FBBO Gold Member

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                                I've done this in a pinch, I used insulated butt connectors but pulled the insulation off. Leave just enough wire exposed to get the solder on the wire and put the heat to the connector not the wire. To combat corrosion and wire fatigue now that it's solid at least at the connector I use a high shrink ratio self sealing (gluing) shrink wrap much like you'd use on a submersible pump. Using high shrink ratio shrink wrap will give you a really thick sturdy wrap, coupled with the glue it takes a lot of the abuse off of the connection while also sealing it water tight. Overkill, maybe.. but it's usually done for good.
                                 
                                Last edited: Apr 20, 2021
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                                • 72 Satellite

                                  72 Satellite Well-Known Member

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                                  Thank you.
                                   
                                • Timothy

                                  Timothy Member

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                                  Just my opinion, if your looking for a splice that is not only load bearing but a tight and low resistance splice I would use what is called a Western Union splice or a Linesman splice. I think is a much stronger splice than what is shown in #6 above but similar.
                                   
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                                  • 72 Satellite

                                    72 Satellite Well-Known Member

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                                    Thanks! I just watched a video on the Western Union Splice, pretty cool, can't believe it's been around since the 19th century! I wonder how easy it would be with 10 awg in such a tight spot to work in, couple inches in between sections of the Junction Block?
                                     
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