Which electronic ignition

Cheapsunglasses

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I've had great success using the Pertronix Igniter II with the black Flame Thrower coil to maintain a stock appearance. I have a great advance curve built into my stock points distributor, so this method was about $200 from Summit. If you are concerned with the extra 12v power supply wire, you can simply solder a jumper to the back side of your ballast resistor to keep a constant 12v running to the coil and simply attach the power lead to the + side of the coil. It's a reliable, super clean and stealthy installation.
Thanks! I’ll post pictures of it when I’m done, but I’m gutting an old parts store ECU I’ve had laying around for a while, and hiding the HEI module in it. And I’m soldering the wires to the pins, so the factory harness will plug in. And then to keep the stealth going, I’ll be gutting the voltage regulator, and putting a piece of 10 gauge wire in it.

I can certainly keep a points distributor in it, or just buy a $200 conversion kit. But where’s the fun in that!
:lol:
 

Cheapsunglasses

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I said voltage regulator, when I meant ballast resistor :BangHead:, sorry for any confusion
 

Kimodc

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Switched from points to pertronix II in stock distributor and flame thrower coil. Couldn’t be happier and very simple to install! I am finishing up the interior of the car still, so not a lot of miles on it yet, but seems like a great improvement so far…..cars runs smoother and seems more responsive. Timing light shows it so much steadier. I know there are a lot of die hard “points”proponents here, but I have moved on. The steel wheel was an incredibly simple and fail-proof design, but I am not using those either.
 

Cheapsunglasses

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Switched from points to pertronix II in stock distributor and flame thrower coil. Couldn’t be happier and very simple to install! I am finishing up the interior of the car still, so not a lot of miles on it yet, but seems like a great improvement so far…..cars runs smoother and seems more responsive. Timing light shows it so much steadier. I know there are a lot of die hard “points”proponents here, but I have moved on. The steel wheel was an incredibly simple and fail-proof design, but I am not using those either.
Thanks! I’m beginning to wonder how many people are like Henry Ford, and wished we never progressed passed the model T.
:lol:

Some people have to have stock, some like to upgrade. That’s what makes this hobby fun!
 

Don Frelier

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I've never tried it but you can use the Mopar ECU with points:
1656535794761.png
 

Cheapsunglasses

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I've never tried it but you can use the Mopar ECU with points:
View attachment 1306096
Oh that’s interesting. Thanks for the suggestion! I’ve already gotten all the parts to do a HEI with an electronic. I’m pretty excited about doing this, it’s something I’ve never done, so the research and thinking is fun!
 

Don Frelier

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Also the "shorting" wire inside the ballast need not be any lower gauge than the wires connected to it.
 

Cheapsunglasses

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Actually that’s what Mercedes SL’s using d jet use. They have a points distributor, that fires the ECU.

The various types of ignition systems and how they work is a very interesting research subject.
:popcorn:
 

JoePole

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Something else to think about. I had the same crank but occasional no start issue as KD in post 7 and could not find the issue. I recently did an engine swap and added a ground block to the firewall and ran additional grounds from Ign Module and V reg. Also added a rear block ground to the frame and cleaned up the contacts in the firewall to cab harness junction and dielectric grease on all contacts. Seems to have cured the no start issue. Bonus is no more dimming lights and stable voltage. I guess what I am trying to say is make sure all contacts are clean and have good mounting. Dielectric grease is your friend.
 

Cheapsunglasses

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Something else to think about. I had the same crank but occasional no start issue as KD in post 7 and could not find the issue. I recently did an engine swap and added a ground block to the firewall and ran additional grounds from Ign Module and V reg. Also added a rear block ground to the frame and cleaned up the contacts in the firewall to cab harness junction and dielectric grease on all contacts. Seems to have cured the no start issue. Bonus is no more dimming lights and stable voltage. I guess what I am trying to say is make sure all contacts are clean and have good mounting. Dielectric grease is your friend.
That’s a really good point, thanks!

When I bought the car 5 years ago, it seemed like a stalled out project form 20 years ago, engine, trans, wiring, all gone. I was halfway tempted to piece a b body under dash harness from a swap meet, and a c body engine harness from the junkyard, and then make my own tail harness

Then I got to thinking more about that, I’m pretty mechanically inclined, but the electronic wizards sometimes confuse me, and I don’t want to deal with issues lol. So I bought an American auto wire harness, which has a lot of added grounds, and is clearly labeled. Got the car wired, added relays to the headlights, put an electronic voltage regulator in, and my volt gauge doesn’t jump around and I don’t have any pesky gremlins living in it.
 

68 Sport Satellite

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Does anyone else besides me use the Mopar Chrome box ECU for street duty? I had read long ago that they are more reliable than the orange box. Mine has been working well for about 6 yrs over 8000 miles. Not excessively long, but pretty decent. I hope it doesn't crap out one day unexpectedly, but most parts will eventually go bad. I keep a spare in the trunk.

I use the Mopar Chrome Box along with a 1 ohm ballast resistor, an MSD epoxy filled Blaster 2 coil, and a Firecore Vacuum Advance distributor with adjustable mechanical advance (no welding needed, just use the mallory plastic gap key set and lock down the position with the set screws. It's not easy to get it dialed in EXACTLY every time though - it took me 3 or 4 times of set it, install distributor, check timing, remove, adjust, repeat.

Also, way back in 2011 shortly after I got my car, I had suggested switching to the GM HEI setup and most here on B bodies blasted me for even suggesting it. I'm glad to see many of us are more willing to venture into new territory. I'm anxious to hear about the OP's HEI success, both short and long term reports.
 

Cheapsunglasses

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Does anyone else besides me use the Mopar Chrome box ECU for street duty? I had read long ago that they are more reliable than the orange box. Mine has been working well for about 6 yrs over 8000 miles. Not excessively long, but pretty decent. I hope it doesn't crap out one day unexpectedly, but most parts will eventually go bad. I keep a spare in the trunk.

I use the Mopar Chrome Box along with a 1 ohm ballast resistor, an MSD epoxy filled Blaster 2 coil, and a Firecore Vacuum Advance distributor with adjustable mechanical advance (no welding needed, just use the mallory plastic gap key set and lock down the position with the set screws. It's not easy to get it dialed in EXACTLY every time though - it took me 3 or 4 times of set it, install distributor, check timing, remove, adjust, repeat.

Also, way back in 2011 shortly after I got my car, I had suggested switching to the GM HEI setup and most here on B bodies blasted me for even suggesting it. I'm glad to see many of us are more willing to venture into new territory. I'm anxious to hear about the OP's HEI success, both short and long term reports.
I wasn’t aware they still made the chrome box, I thought it was discontinued. I’m glad it’s working well for you!

I don’t like the looks of the gm style hei distributor, but I’m a fan of if it works it works.

Are saying there might be some interest, and I should start a build thread?
 

Sinitro

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I am still running a Mopar chrome box for 15 years, also over the last several years Mopar has sourced this part from multiple suppliers with mixed reliability results... Also when running a MSD Blaster II coil and chrome box, the ballast resistor should be 0.25 OHM part #P2444641. But note that finding these parts today it is getting very tough..

Just my $0.02...
 

Cheapsunglasses

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I am still running a Mopar chrome box for 15 years, also over the last several years Mopar has sourced this part from multiple suppliers with mixed reliability results... Also when running a MSD Blaster II coil and chrome box, the ballast resistor should be 0.25 OHM part #P2444641. But note that finding these parts today it is getting very tough..

Just my $0.02...
Thanks for commenting. I’ve never worked with HEI, and I like tinkering with things, so when members starting mentioning it, it sparked my curiosity. Then I kinda went down a rabbit hole, and got real interested on how to make it work. Which is why I decided to go this route
 

64 Plan B

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Thanks for the replies everyone!

I know points ignition is superior, that’s why every new car being built has it :poke:

I’m still a little curious on the Mancinis kit, is there really anything making it $20 more? What does “hipo” ECU mean, is it any better quality, does it have a better curve in it?

Does it really matter for an engine that mostly runs 2-3,000rpm, with the occasional “carburetor cleaning” 4-5,000 rpm bursts
I have to chime in on this one…
The most economical option is to find a donor car…. Take the ECM , voltage regulator , alternator , distributor, coil and all wiring associated
With the distributor out, you can spin it and check for any slop , set the reluctor to 8/1000 with a plastic gauge
Install and test.
I found a donor with “lean burn” components , so I bought a chrome box ECM for $100 from Ma. Been running it for 15 years or so - no prob
 

Cheapsunglasses

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I have to chime in on this one…
The most economical option is to find a donor car…. Take the ECM , voltage regulator , alternator , distributor, coil and all wiring associated
With the distributor out, you can spin it and check for any slop , set the reluctor to 8/1000 with a plastic gauge
Install and test.
I found a donor with “lean burn” components , so I bought a chrome box ECM for $100 from Ma. Been running it for 15 years or so - no prob
Thanks for chiming in! I know going to the junkyard is an economical solution, and I love crawling around a junkyard! I just wanted try something different, and other then the coil, which I could use the one I had but decided to upgrade while I was there, I don’t think I spent too much

$20 hei module
$48 distributor
$70 coil

Everything is new, which with all Chinese manufacturing, could be good, it could be bad, I don’t know
:lol:
 

68 Sport Satellite

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Thanks for chiming in! I know going to the junkyard is an economical solution, and I love crawling around a junkyard! I just wanted try something different, and other then the coil, which I could use the one I had but decided to upgrade while I was there, I don’t think I spent too much

$20 hei module
$48 distributor
$70 coil

Everything is new, which with all Chinese manufacturing, could be good, it could be bad, I don’t know
:lol:
With the HEI setup, does it require a Voltage Regulator? If so, I would opt for an adjustable unit with the small flat head adjusting pot on the back. I run one of those now, but previously did not and fried my gauge cluster because my aftermarket 70A alternator (higher than stock output) was resulting in 15V at the battery with the motor running. With the adjustable VR I dialed it back to 12.9V and all is good. Still need to replace my fried gauges though.
 

Cheapsunglasses

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With the HEI setup, does it require a Voltage Regulator? If so, I would opt for an adjustable unit with the small flat head adjusting pot on the back. I run one of those now, but previously did not and fried my gauge cluster because my aftermarket 70A alternator (higher than stock output) was resulting in 15V at the battery with the motor running. With the adjustable VR I dialed it back to 12.9V and all is good. Still need to replace my fried gauges though.
That’s an excellent question, that I do not have an answer for, and didn’t even think about.

Hopefully someone can answer .
 

64 Plan B

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So , on any of the factory point ignition cars , the alternator had a different output wiring set up - and a specific regulator…
When I upgraded mine to electronic (many years ago) I kept killing my battery because I hadn’t addressed this issue
I ended up changing to an updated alternator and regulator - no problems since
 

68 Sport Satellite

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Years ago, I had a 318 in the car. Before my 1st 440 swap, I converted the wiring to the famous Mopar Performance electronic ignition. Since then, the system has performed well for the most part but occasionally, I'll get a "no spark" condition where it cranks and cranks but won't start. During this time when it won't fire up, I've changed ballast resistors, colis, ECUs, distributors and even voltage regulators. As odd as it sounds, sometimes it suddenly starts and runs normally after any one of those changes. To me, this indicates that I may have just had a loose connection somewhere or that some sadistic person has a voodoo doll of my car and screws with me just for fun.
The previous generation Mopar Performance distributor is supposed to be a modified Accel or Mallory unit that was scaled down to fit a Mopar. Our B/RB distributors have a small space to work in so the size of the distributor is limited. That scaled down aftermarket distributor has light advance weights that supposedly cause fluctuating timing and spark scatter. Rick Ehrenberg claims that you can see the timing light/timing mark bounce around and move back and forth with the engine at any rpm.
I still have mine but have considered a switch to something better. I want vacuum advance though. It does help with fuel economy. Yeah, these are not economy cars but 2 mpg spread out over a 19 gallon tank could mean driving to the next gas station or filling up early when you still have 3/4 tank.
About the timing bouncing around - I came across this distributor shaft collar that supposedly addresses one potential cause of this issue. The purpose of adding this collar is to prevent the intermediate shaft oil pump drive gear from climbing up the vertical slop on the distributor shaft, which affects ignition timing due to the slant of the gear teeth. The lock essentially eliminates/reduces the amount of slop that the gear can climb.

Has anyone tried installing one of these shaft collars? Reviews I've ready seem positive.
I've seen some photos where the collar is installed on the end of the distributor shaft and some install it on the end of the oil pump drive shaft. I'm not sure which is better or appropriate.

I don't want to derail the thread onto a new topic, but had to ask....

Rick E-booger's ebay site sells one:
for Mopar Distributor Collar Timing Stabilizer 340 440 383 Hemi Dodge Plymouth | eBay
"If you've had trouble with unstable idle, detonation, spark scatter etc., this hardened steel collar can sometimes resolve the issue. Slips on distributor shaft to keep oil pump / distributor drive shaft / gear firmly "planted" in the block. This takes out "bounce" between the distributor shaft and drive gear (in block) , preventing gear from moving upwards as oil pump torque varies as each gerotor lobe builds pressure.
Fits all big block (383-400-440), LA and Poly small blocks, and 426 Hemis. Not needed on 318 / 360 Magnums (i.e., '92-93 up) - they are crank-triggered ignition.
Detailed instructions included."

From an E-bodies site:
"The old racers trick was to just put a length of rubber hose on the end of the distributor shaft. It does the same thing. It keeps the oil pump drive from bouncing. If the end of the distributor shaft doesn't bottom out in the oil pump drive, it could bounce. Since the teeth are cut at an angle, any up/down movement changes the timing. The problem with the hose is that it eventually breaks down from being in constant contact with the oil"

For the collar - "To set the depth correctly, install the collar on the shaft, just tight enough that it will stay where it is, but can still move. Install the distributor and make sure it is fully seated. The collar will slide up to the correct depth. Pull it out, tighten it down and you should be good to go."
 
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