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1970 Sport Fury Six Pack

Auggie56

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Muscle Cars You Should Know: ’70 Plymouth Sport Fury GT 440-6
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By Diego Rosenberg July 26, 2011
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With the advent of the ’64 Pontiac GTO, thus began the muscle car era. Obviously there were muscular cars before the GTO – as full-size performance cars – from Chevrolet, Dodge and Plymouth, Ford and Mercury, and even Pontiac all competing on America’s streets and strips for a few years already, but the title of “muscle car” seemed to be the sole property of the intermediate-sized machines. And by 1967, full-size performance cars were terribly out of favor.

The Bow Tie boys from Warren, Michigan introduced the 385-horsepower Super Sport 427 package for the ’67 Impala, but that and “regular” 427 full-size cars only numbered several thousand. Both lasted through 1969, with less than 600 of the L72 427/425 being built that year. The top motor option for 1970 was the LS5 454 but no one was buying them to race.

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Part of the Fury's appeal was sporty beltlines and sharp curves, but the "large is luxurious" idea. While the Sport Fury GT could be equally equipped as its smaller siblings, the big Plymouth boasted a comfier ride and plusher amenities than the 'Cuda and Road Runner.

The situation was similar for FoMoCo, as only 89 big Fords received the 427 in 1967. For 1968, the 428 Police Interceptor became Top Dog for the full-sized, but 345 horsepower didn’t really cut it on the street.

The new-for-1969 429 Thunder Jet with 360 horsepower turned it into a stump-puller, but it wasn’t very fast. Additionally, Ford never really had a full-size performance model – the XL was merely a trim level with a sporty persona.

Pontiac stopped offering the 2+2 after 1967 (although it continued in Canada through ’70) and the 390-horsepower 428 HO after ’69. The 455 for 1970 wasn’t in the same league.

And up until that time, neither Dodge or Plymouth offered a full-size performance model or package in the 1960s. From 1967 through 1969, it was possible to order a high performance 440 4-barrel in the big Mopars, but they weren’t making news on the street scene, unless it was a cop car hot on your trail.

And then, for 1970, Plymouth introduced the Sport Fury GT.

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Introducing the 1970 Rapid Transit System Image: SixPackFuryRegistry.com

It’s a little curious why Plymouth would introduce a full-size muscle car when everyone else had abandoned the segment (and the muscle car market was shrinking besides). However, 1970 was a banner year for muscle cars in general and for Plymouth specifically since they introduced the Rapid Transit System.

“Everybody offers a car. Only Plymouth offers a system,” screamed a period ad. Plymouth felt that anyone could build a car with a big engine, but the System offered a lot more than that: A “total concept in transportation that goes beyond eight pistons and a steering wheel.” The System was all about:

  • Racing in sanctioned events.
  • Getting the straight scoop from the factory on “how to tune your car, modify it, which equipment to use, and how to set the whole thing up for racing.”
  • Hosting Supercar Clinics conducted by Plymouth’s own racers.
  • High-performance parts packaged and available at your local neighborhood Plymouth dealer.
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Today, original 440 Six-Barrel equipped Sport Furys are hard to come by. While registries claim only 11 units, production numbers were somewhat higher (only marginally) at 64. Images: Flickr

“Above all, the R.T.S. is the product…a complete high-performance car, with suspension, brakes, driveline, and tires to match.” And as a member of the Rapid Transit System, the Sport Fury with the A52 GT package in its standard form was equipped to do battle:

  • High-performance 440cui 350hp Wedge (“economy” versions not available, according to the ad)
  • High-performance Carter AVS four-barrel carburetor
  • High-flow cylinder heads and intake manifold
  • High-upshift TorqueFlite automatic transmission
  • Heavy-duty suspension with 0.98″ diameter torsion bars
  • Heavy-duty shock absorbers
  • Heavy-duty 0.98′ diameter anti-sway bar
  • Heavy-duty 6-leaf rear springs
  • Heavy-duty 11″ drum brakes
  • High-performance dual exhaust system with 2 1/2″ exhaust pipes, twin mufflers, and 2 1/4″ tail pipes
  • Heavy-duty driveshaft and U-joint
  • Heavy-duty rear axle
  • Heavy-duty battery, 70 amp/hr.
  • Extra-wide 6″ road wheels
  • Fiberglass-belted H70 x 15″ tires
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Although never available with the venerable 426 HEMI elephant, the Sport Fury GT did offer the brand's next most potent powerplant, the 440 Six-Barrel (known to Dodges as the "Six-Pack").

Interestingly, the Super Commando 440 375-horsepower motor – standard on the GTX and available on the ‘Cuda – was neither standard nor available for the Sport Fury GT. However, the 440 six-barrel was a legitimate upgrade. This was the only C-body (internal code for “Mopar big car!”) ever to receive this motor. Fed by three Holley two-barrel carburetors, it was rated at 390 horsepower @ 4700 rpm.

This engine was initially introduced mid-year in 1969 as part of the A12 package for the Road Runner and Super Bee. That package also included a nifty hingeless fiberglass hood that was tested in wind tunnels for air induction efficiency. For 1970, the motor was given general release for most of Mopar’s muscle car offerings but with conventional Mopar hoods and equipment.

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Hood stripes of 1970 Sport Fury GT Image: SportFuryGT.com

Like all members of the Rapid Transit System, Plymouth’s designers gave the Sport Fury GT some pop art touches. Reflective strobe stripes wrapped themselves around the car just below the beltline, and the Fury’s subtle hood bulges received accent stripes.

Several High Impact colors were available, including In Violet, Limelight, Lemon Twist, Vitamin C, Tor Red, and – come mid-year – Moulin Rouge and Sassy Grass Green. And since the GT was based on the Sport Fury, it received standard hidden headlights and was trimmed to a higher level.

But when the model year was tallied, only 666 GTs were built. No documentation has been found to determine how many came with the 440 6-bbl., but it’s believed the number was 64. According to the 1970 Sport Fury GT 440-6 Registry, 11 are known.

After a poor showing for 1970, you would think the Sport Fury GT would have disappeared. Instead, Plymouth made it wilder for 1971. Standard power now came from a 370-horsepower Super Commando 440 while the six-barrel option was dropped (although it continued in the ‘Cuda, GTX, and Road Runner).

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Somewhat subdued in its styling, the Sport Fury GT did tout some key nods to its sleeker, sportier brethren.



Stripes on the hood were used as an identifier, unlike in 1970, with wide “GT” graphics cradled by pinstripes that spanned the length of the hood. Strobe stripes circling the body were a bit more prominent, and “GT” graphics on the rear quarters looked like they were branded by the men working the line at Lynch Road.

All other changes were across the board for Furys, such as a busier grille and taillights. As part of the Rapid Transit System, the facelifted 1971 Sport Fury GT was in good company with ‘Cudas with “billboard” decals, brand-new Road Runners and GTXs with numerous stripe configurations, and a refreshed Duster 340. And like every performance car sold in 1971, sales were down drastically – only 375 Sport Fury GTs were built.

Plymouth finally got the message about full-size performance cars and quietly laid the Sport Fury GT to rest along with an assortment of other hi-po items in the stable. And while the Rapid Transit System continued on through 1972, it was no longer “the System” that terrorized the tracks and streets but merely an apparition of Plymouth’s former self.

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Emasculated "System" for '72 Image: lhmopars.com
 
I always LOVED that Poster: "Rapid Transit System", AND furthermore I NEVER KNEW what that middle Car was....!!
WOW, talk about rarity and of course as we all know "Rarity" does not mean "Exclusive" or "Valuable".
In this case it does....
WOW,
I'd love to have one....


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Like them alot, class with power! There is a B7 one that is always at Carlisle every year, I always make it a point to see it.

Hood pins do look out of place on the black one.
 
There's a guy on Moparts that had 3 project V code 70 Sport Furys. I believe he sold one of the three,and someone is restoring it. It is Black.
 
Certainly not taking anything away from a 440-6 car, would like one myself. But when it comes to full size muscle I still think my '65 Monaco 426W 4-speed has to be one of the rarest full size stormers. We see how many SF GT's are known....at least 11 with more made. And let's not get started on the 300 Hurst...nearly 500 made. And with both, all automatics. Can anyone show me proof of another 426 4- speed '65 Monaco?? I have not been able to track down another, have come across 3 with automatics. If you have PROOF please post or forward to me. Thanks!
 
You will get over the new Challengers weight,when you click off a 10 second 1/4 mile in one.
 
Certainly not taking anything away from a 440-6 car, would like one myself. But when it comes to full size muscle I still think my '65 Monaco 426W 4-speed has to be one of the rarest full size stormers. We see how many SF GT's are known....at least 11 with more made. And let's not get started on the 300 Hurst...nearly 500 made. And with both, all automatics. Can anyone show me proof of another 426 4- speed '65 Monaco?? I have not been able to track down another, have come across 3 with automatics. If you have PROOF please post or forward to me. Thanks!

Pictures?
 
Certainly not taking anything away from a 440-6 car, would like one myself. But when it comes to full size muscle I still think my '65 Monaco 426W 4-speed has to be one of the rarest full size stormers. We see how many SF GT's are known....at least 11 with more made. And let's not get started on the 300 Hurst...nearly 500 made. And with both, all automatics. Can anyone show me proof of another 426 4- speed '65 Monaco?? I have not been able to track down another, have come across 3 with automatics. If you have PROOF please post or forward to me. Thanks!
I would love to know more about your 426 Monaco. Was it a Max Wedge? Compression ratio? Please post some pics. Thanks.
 
Not a Max just a Street Wedge,factory rated at 365 horses. Will post more info and pics tomorrow,heading out with the Mrs. for the evening. Happy New Year all.
 
If you were to ever drive a 392 or Hellcat Challenger, that little factoid would be the last thing you'd be thinking of.
Unless you are the NHRA listening to the Ford n chebbie crybabies. That is the first thing they think of. The new Cobra Jet and Camaro couldn't beat the Drag Pac cars that are already hundreds of lbs more. NHRA is up to the same tricks that they have been up to since the Max Wedges in the sixties. Keep adding 50# weights to them damn Mopars til we can beat em.
 
For those interested....I'll do my best to keep it short. I owned a '65 Monaco from 8/1991 to 6/2016. Had never seen a 426W 4-speed '65 Monaco until the one I own now popped up for sale. It was in Bensalem,PA and except for a 4 year stint in Florida, was a PA car until it came to NJ. The person I purchased from said...."even if you don't buy it,come look at it,it will be the only one you will ever see". As of this day that statement still rings true. There are no solid numbers on production. A vast majority of people in the Mopar hobby have said maybe a handful were built. Ok, here is the speculation on numbers from "sources"(this was discussed on another board), someone looked at Galen's white book and said the number was 242? or close to that. Let's say 250 for arguments sake(that is believed to be ALL '65 Monacos with a 4-speed which would be the 383 and 426,the 413 was not available with it in the States). Another person stated they knew somebody who had a better handle on the production. Turns out they were going off "percentages"....x amount of engines,x amount of trannies, = x amount with this combo. Very highly suspect as they claim around 150 with the 426-4 which leaves 100 for the 383-4. Having spent a long time dealing with '65 Monacos I do not buy it. In nearly 30 years I have only seen or known of 4 with a 383 4 speed, and as stated mine is the only one that I have ever come across with the 426W and 4-speed. Form your own opinion from the info I have provided, all I'm saying is it MAY BE the only one left. If anyone has PROOF of another please post it or PM me, would love to see it.
This car has a fender tag but no build sheet. However I do have a copy of the build tag from Chrysler Historical proving it is indeed the real thing. And yes it is for sale, needs a complete resto and comes with almost all factory sheet metal needed and a large trove of used and NOS pieces to aid in the resurrection. If you have any questions please feel free to PM me and I will fill you in. Thanks for the read guys and some pics.

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The 10 second Challenger is bone stock,no Buick does that. And there's a 9 second stock Challenger too.
 
My cousin has a 1970 Plymouth Sport Fury S23 that he has owned since 1982. Unfortunately it has sat for the past number of years.
Blue with the white reflective stripe. It's a sharp car for sure. Perhaps some day we can make a deal if I ever get more roof area.
There weren't many of these in circulation. They really rode and drove nicely.
 
that cant be helped,buick stopped making real cars after the gnx.
i only added that comment because the thread was about musclecars most dont own or run.
plus im still to this day amused by the hemi shootout bitd with the stage 1 and the hemi gtx.
" buicks run like they are tied to a tree " didnt end well for the hemi.
apologies if the buick post i made upset you.

the new challengers are powerful,but heavy,and and far as bone stock,
yes its a great time to be alive for cars and technology.
seeing as these come " bone stock " with a 840hp? supercharged motor.

the ones mentioned are drag cars from the factory/2018 models
Both cars get a good launch, with the Demon setting a time of 10.07 seconds at 133 mph,
and the Hellcat laying down a respectable 11.09 seconds at 124 mph.
The new top-dog 2019 Hellcat makes 797 hp, 707 lb-ft of torque,
and does 0-60 in 3.4 seconds and a 10.8-second quarter-mile.
If you can get it to hook up.


seems like quite a bit of money for a 1 second improvement,doesnt it?
speaking of costs,
how many classic musclecars could you buy for the price of a new redeye?
after the dealer markup and the flippers start pushing the prices skyward?
and tbh,that new car loses value whereas classics dont,if you chose wisely.

seems more like the challenger is a big kids toy,rather than an investment to me.
that doesnt make them any less awesome,
nor does it take anything away from the Fact that ma mopar is the one to beat again.
i really chuckled at sixpacktogo-s post,its just like the 70-s all over again.
keep adding weight to them mopars till someone else wins :lol:

back to the sport fury,i always loved those cars,
and thought of them as the musclecar you drove during the week to work,
and on the weekend you broke out the duster or cuda to go to the track with.:steering:
 
For those interested....I'll do my best to keep it short. I owned a '65 Monaco from 8/1991 to 6/2016. Had never seen a 426W 4-speed '65 Monaco until the one I own now popped up for sale. It was in Bensalem,PA and except for a 4 year stint in Florida, was a PA car until it came to NJ. The person I purchased from said...."even if you don't buy it,come look at it,it will be the only one you will ever see". As of this day that statement still rings true. There are no solid numbers on production. A vast majority of people in the Mopar hobby have said maybe a handful were built. Ok, here is the speculation on numbers from "sources"(this was discussed on another board), someone looked at Galen's white book and said the number was 242? or close to that. Let's say 250 for arguments sake(that is believed to be ALL '65 Monacos with a 4-speed which would be the 383 and 426,the 413 was not available with it in the States). Another person stated they knew somebody who had a better handle on the production. Turns out they were going off "percentages"....x amount of engines,x amount of trannies, = x amount with this combo. Very highly suspect as they claim around 150 with the 426-4 which leaves 100 for the 383-4. Having spent a long time dealing with '65 Monacos I do not buy it. In nearly 30 years I have only seen or known of 4 with a 383 4 speed, and as stated mine is the only one that I have ever come across with the 426W and 4-speed. Form your own opinion from the info I have provided, all I'm saying is it MAY BE the only one left. If anyone has PROOF of another please post it or PM me, would love to see it.
This car has a fender tag but no build sheet. However I do have a copy of the build tag from Chrysler Historical proving it is indeed the real thing. And yes it is for sale, needs a complete resto and comes with almost all factory sheet metal needed and a large trove of used and NOS pieces to aid in the resurrection. If you have any questions please feel free to PM me and I will fill you in. Thanks for the read guys and some pics.

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I know of someone in Toledo Ohio that had a 65 dodge 880 convertible with a 426 4 speed. It’s been sold though and I don’t know where it went.
 
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