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OIL SLINGER

EARLY B

FBBO Gold Member
FBBO Gold Member
Local time
8:40 PM
Joined
Oct 7, 2014
Messages
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Location
ALLENTOWN,PA
Has anyone seen this on a oil slinger before?
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Looks like the timing chain is getting into it somehow. Is there a ton of slack in the chain?
 
Your pic is blurry. Is that a damaged part, or is it manufactured with those serrations along the circumference ?
 
After market damper not machined correct. There needs to be a champher on the end th
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at contacts the slinger.
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I have seen that type of wear pattern before, but not in person.
Good catch!!

I’ve seen it with some with aftermarket cranks that the diameter of the snout, where the gear rides, is extended out past the gear enough that it interferes with the slinger being able to fit up flush against the gear.
When that happens you can end up with a distorted slinger, and the damper not being seated square and firm against the slinger/gear.

I’ve seen enough irregularities with that situation that I don’t bother using the slinger on aftermarket cranks anymore.
 
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I believe chrysler went away from the slinger when they changed their front seal design to a lip type.
 
My first experience with the slinger causing issues was found when freshening a very nice, pretty high dollar build(that the owner had assembled himself originally).
As it turned out the the damper/slinger/lower gear/crank/timing cover all needed some attention.

The engine had a Callies crank, ATI damper, Indy timing cover, and an American made SA Gear timing set.
My first hint that something was amiss after I pulled the damper and timing cover off was some minor chafing marks on the crank where the gear rides.
That’s when I discovered the deformed slinger wouldn’t slide over the slightly larger diameter of where the gear rides, which extended out past the gear.
I also saw mild witness marks in the area of the crank, where the backside of the gear would rest.

The more I looked things over the more problems I found…..all related to this one area one the engine.

The chamfer on the back of the gear wasn’t large enough to allow the gear to sit all the way back/flat against the crank.
After reworking the gear so it went all the way back, then it had the larger diameter for the gear sticking out past the gear even more.
I had considered modifying the slinger, but instead decided to leave it out.

The snout is about .031” smaller than where the gear rides.
The ATI damper counter bore was a few thou smaller than where the gear rides, and since it needed to be able to butt up against the gear I ended up making a short, slightly larger counter bore.
The owner had relieved the timing cover during the original assembly, and it was Still very close to touching.
But, now with the gear back a little from relieving the chamfer, and the missing slinger, it was now contacting the cover.
I ended up replacing the damper hub with a longer one……which I had to modify the counter bore on as well.

Lots of little problems for something so basic.
 
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My first experience with the slinger causing issues was found when freshening a very nice, pretty high dollar build(that the owner had assembled himself originally).
As it turned out the the damper/slinger/lower gear/crank/timing cover all needed some attention.

The engine had a Callies crank, ATI damper, Indy timing cover, and an American made SA Gear timing set.
My first hint that something was amiss after I pulled the damper and timing cover off was some minor chafing marks on the crank where the gear rides.
That’s when I discovered the deformed slinger wouldn’t slide over the slightly larger diameter of where the gear rides, which extended out past the gear.
I also saw to mild witness marks in the area of the crank, where the backside of the gear would rest.
The issue is the crank damper gear end is too large for the slinger to seat flush, it sits about .040 high when I lay the slinger on the damper, when tightened it deforms the slinger forcing it back against the chain. No slinger will be used with this damper!
 
I understood the “cause and affect” of your situation.

I was just reminiscing about how when you’re building an engine from a bunch of parts the come from different manufacturers……….. sometimes even the basic stuff can cause assembly problems.

Like your damper and the slinger.
If you really wanted a slinger in there……you could have a chamfer put on the damper.
 
Like I said, that was a good find, and something I’ll keep in mind on future builds.

Good little tidbit of info.:thumbsup:
 
Like I said, that was a good find, and something I’ll keep in mind on future builds.

Good little tidbit of info.:thumbsup:
I left the slinger out this time. I still can't explain why the slinger was an issue with the roller cam, but not the flat tappet. The only thing i changed was the cam and added a button. I use a Molnar crank and ATI damper. Could be similar issue as mentioned above, but my wear only went halfway around the slinger.
 
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