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'62 charging system help needed

nutz4spd

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I've gone through two alternators and voltage regulators so far and the charging system isn't charging. It's eating alternators and I can't figure out why. The field wire from the alternator is going to the FLD post on the regulator. 12v ignition is on the other side. I haven't been able to find where to hot wire on the alternator is going to though. I do know I don't see it going to the battery which I find strange. Then again, I'm new to Mopars. I do remember the regulator that was in the car when I bought it would buzz when you first turn the key. But that's been replaced. The car has a fuel injected 413 with an MSD box and an electronic distributor. I read something briefly about the older regulators not working with electronic ignitions. Is this true? Where is the hot wire from the alternator supposed to go? If someone has a charging system wiring diagram that would be helpful.

A side note, when the car was acting up a few days ago the starter wanted to keep engaging a little after I turned the car off. I know these have a starter relay on the firewall and mine appears to have several things attached to it. Could a bad starter relay or starter have an effect on the charging system?

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Have you hooked up a volt meter while it's running and checked voltage at the battery?

I'm running a Pertronix w/ flamethrower coil so I switched to a solid state regulator. The points type was giving me fits.

The black wire from the alternator post goes in through the bulkhead connector to the ammeter. The green goes to VR.
 
I did. Running, it reads 12.17v. I haven't started the car yet with this (3rd) new alternator. I wanted to make sure everything was wired and connected as it should be before I potentially fry another alternator.
 
Most of the time wiring does not cause an alternator to fail. I would want to see what has failed in the alternator. Lots of poor quality junk out there.
 
This is what I found when I took the first alternator (the one that came on the car) apart. It looks like the wire connection burned the case and melted the solder that was there. Looks like a simple resolder fix?

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This is what I found when I took the first alternator (the one that came on the car) apart. It looks like the wire connection burned the case and melted the solder that was there. Looks like a simple resolder fix?

View attachment 1416726
That will cut back some of the charge rate. The diodes will need to be tested. Kind of an odd failure. Might of been poor wire or routed wrong and shorted to ground. Could be fixed.
 
I was going to suggest that the old mechanical voltage regulators have fusible links inside them that can burn off, causing the alternator not to charge. But, it appears your VR is a newer solid state one. Maybe it has some type of similar charge protection. You could get it checked out at an alternator/generator repair shop. It looks like your car has had some wiring work done, judging by the non-factory connectors. See if someone has added a fusible link wire that has failed.
 
*throws hands up* I've put a new alternator, voltage regulator, and starter Relay on this car and still don't have a charging system that works. I have 12v on the ignition side of the VR with the key on and 12v on the FLD side when the car is running. There is 12v at the alternator terminal. The Amp gauge inside will read close to the charge side but bounces a little. I read an article on bypassing the Amp gauge since they have been known to cause problems. Would this be wise to do? I don't see any fusible links in the wiring, so that's out but I would add them if I did this bypass. I'm at a loss as to why the system isn't working. The only electronics are the ingnition, the MSD box, fuel pump, and throttle body. That's it. Could it be that all these create such a load that the stock alternator can't keep up?? HELP!!! *bangs head*
 
Do you have battery power on the stud at the alternator? It is a simple system.
 
Yep. A full 12v at the stud.
Then run a HD jumper from that stud to the battery and then check the voltage. What style brushes do you have? If just one field wire the other brush needs to be grounded.
 
Then run a HD jumper from that stud to the battery and then check the voltage. What style brushes do you have? If just one field wire the other brush needs to be grounded.

Yes, it's a single field wire. I was under the impression that the other one is grounded internally since there is no tab to connect a wire to. I'll have to see if I can find some thicker wire for a jumper. Most of what I have is just smaller 10 ga or so.
 
Yes, it's a single field wire. I was under the impression that the other one is grounded internally since there is no tab to connect a wire to. I'll have to see if I can find some thicker wire for a jumper. Most of what I have is just smaller 10 ga or so.
You have to be careful on the brush. If that brush has an insulator it may not be grounded. If it has a spade ground it or at least check it with a meter to be sure it is grounded. Some will fit the 70 and newer which had two field wires.
 
You have to be careful on the brush. If that brush has an insulator it may not be grounded. If it has a spade ground it or at least check it with a meter to be sure it is grounded. Some will fit the 70 and newer which had two field wires.
Forgive my ignorance, but when you say insulator what would I be looking for? The brush is inside a little housing with a spring and there is a screw on the back side that seems to connect the back of the brush to the casing. Therfore grounding it I would assume.
 
Forgive my ignorance, but when you say insulator what would I be looking for? The brush is inside a little housing with a spring and there is a screw on the back side that seems to connect the back of the brush to the casing. Therfore grounding it I would assume.
You most likely do not have an insulator. Just verify that brush is grounded to the case.
 
If your ballast resistor is real, you don't need it with an electronic distributor.

This is what I did on my 64.
MSD distributor, solid state regulator, stock alternator.
I hollowed out the ballast resistor and ran a wire through it with connectors on either end, then plugged the wires in as normal.

New 10 gauge wire with fuseable link from alternator to starter relay + post.

Took black wire off alternator, shortened it, connected it to + on starter relay. Removed it from the ammeter and dead ended it.
Black wire has splice in harness that feeds dash, lights, etc.

Removed original red wire from ammeter to starter relay completely.

Put a ground hub next to battery and ran wires to battery, voltage regulator (as screwing it on to the firewall is a horrible ground), and alternator case.

On another car that has efi I also ran a ground wire to the throttle body case.

Installed a volt meter.
 
There are up to 1969/70 alternators and then the "New" electronic voltage regulators 1970 on. From personal experience with my '69 Fury the later electronic voltage regulator alternators will not work in the older cars. Make sure you are using the correct one.
 
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