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Cool stuff in the vintage Chiltons repair books

Bad B-rad

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I was looking though my collection of vintage Chilton's repair manuals, some are from my grand pa, some from my father in-law, and some I have picked up over the years.
And in one of them, printed in 1970, it's cover states: contains info for 1963 to 1970 American cars, PLUS Volkswagon.(plus Volkswagon LOL!!!!)

In the general engine spec/Tune up spec section, along with all the regular stuff,you find, like cubic inch, carb size, HP&torque spec, bore and stroke, compression ratio, normal oil psi, spark plug used, and so on.
It also has a spec for cranking compression pressure,(in PSI)
This is a spec that I have not found in any of my other 15-20+ Chilton's books.
In all of my other books it wont contain an exact PSI for any given engine.
It reads more along the lines of: min pressure of 100PSI, and look for uniform PSI numbers across the engine, with no more then 10% change from cylinder to cylinder.

With that being said, this one book, 1963-1970 Chiltons, not only will it give a you a PSI spec for any given engine, but I noticed that the Dodge PSI is higher then the Plymouth one?
Same engine, same year, same bore, and stroke, and compression ratio, but the Dodge section claims 150 psi for 1968-1970 383 or 440, and 140 psi for the 1968-1970 383-440.
What is up with that? Just a printing error?

So I will post a few of them and maybe someone with more experience can tell if they sound correct:

1968 DODGE: 383 4bbl 10 to 1 CR= 150PSI
440 4bbl 10.10 to 1 CR= 150PSI
426 Hemi 10.25 to 1CR=175 PSI

1969 FORD:302 2bbl 9.5 to 1 CR=150PSI
429 4bbl 10.50 to 1 CR=180PSI

1970 GM 250 1bbl 8.50 to 1 CR=130psi
350 4bbl 10.50 to 1 CR=160PSI
427 3X2bbl 10.25 to 1 CR= 160PSI

Do these numbers seam correct, or should it be read as: NO LESS then the given PSI for that engine?
Meaning if you test it, the number should be greater then the given PSI, and if less then, the engine has a leak/or is worn?


I found it interesting that it gave a spec for cranking psi, again as I do not recall seeing this in other Chilton books, and thought that I would look at the PSI of a 1969 440, at 10 to 1 compression ratio, and compare it to 1973 440 with 8 to 1 compression ratio. But again only this one manual, that I have, has this specific info listed.

I wanted to take this cranking psi # for a stock 1969 440 Magnum/Super Commando, and compare it to a smog 8.2 to one 440.
Then use these numbers to see what my buddies 440 has, as his engine was supposed to be rebuilt to factory 1969 specs.

I also have noticed this book, under the valve specifications has valve lift for intake and exhaust.
I found this info really cool because it let me see what camshaft was shared between what engines.

So much GREAT info in these things!!
AS a young guy, I used to enjoy looking over the model identification section, with its combo of drawings, and photographs of the car models each year.
Back when the look of cars changed from year to year!!!
 
I've noticed over the years on forums that one of Chilton's regular inclusions is frequently overlooked.

The inside back cover always has an illustrated Spark Plug Troubleshooting page.
 
The Haynes books are ok, much better then no book at all, but in the Haynes manuals under transmission section, besides the REMOVAL and INSTALL, it says due to the complexity blah blah blah, leave it alone, and we aint telling you $#!t

The Chiltons books have rebuild procedure for like 8 different transmissions!!!

I forgot how great these manuals are, and why I always snatched them up!!!!
 
Motor's were like that too. I had some early sixties issues that had 413's and 426's with 12.5 compression, Pontiacs with 12.5, 406 Fords with gobs of horsepower.
That's where I first saw Studebaker made the same 1HP per cubic inch as Chevy in 1957.
 
Keep in mind that the "advertised" compression ratio's are NOT real actual numbers. With all Mopars the actual CR is much lower. The cranking compression PSI is also very dependent on the camshaft design. Lots of variables involved. The books are just a sort of guideline. The advertised HP numbers are frequently not real. Some way high, some way low. Depends on what the factory was marketing. An early 340 way low, Hemi way low, 383 2bbl probably high, 440 maybe close.
 
Keep in mind that the "advertised" compression ratio's are NOT real actual numbers. With all Mopars the actual CR is much lower. The cranking compression PSI is also very dependent on the camshaft design. Lots of variables involved. The books are just a sort of guideline. The advertised HP numbers are frequently not real. Some way high, some way low. Depends on what the factory was marketing. An early 340 way low, Hemi way low, 383 2bbl probably high, 440 maybe close.

All the Publishers have is what Factories tell them.

Maximum Performance Wedges
1962: 13.5:1
1963: 13.5:1
1964: 12.5:1
 
All the Publishers have is what Factories tell them.

Maximum Performance Wedges
1962: 13.5:1
1963: 13.5:1
1964: 12.5:1

I agree, just realize those CR's are not actual measured CR's. The only way to know what the TRUE CR is is to measure the components.
 
Lol, I noted this in my '76 Chitlin Edition ...........
upload_2021-3-10_7-52-40.png
 
camshaft difference duration & lobe separation/overlap
on a given specific camshaft
like a PSI difference & compression, cylinder spec. changes too
the Plymouth 68-69 Road Runner 383 4bbl engine
had a quicker opening ramp, a lil' longer duration
(much like the later 6bbl camshafts too)
had a slightly different PSI rating than the other versions of the 383
especially 2 bbl or lower performance 4 bbls even

some books are a good guideline
not always 100% accurate

options & your results may vary, some vastly
 
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