Fusible link

dodgedream

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Does anybody have the info on the fusible link load limits? It is on a 1967 coronet big block with a/c and manual.just wondered where it blew at and why wasn’t a regular slo blo fuse used instead?
 

Jerry Hall

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67 has a blue fusible link at the bulkhead under the hood. The color represents the load, but I don't remember that. There is also a under dash fusible link that I don't remember the color of. Your FSM should have this information.
 

Rusty 72

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I'm not an electrician but I think the wire size correlates to the Amperage it'll take. That's why you run a smaller gauge wire for a fusible link.

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70chall440

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Does anybody have the info on the fusible link load limits? It is on a 1967 coronet big block with a/c and manual.just wondered where it blew at and why wasn’t a regular slo blo fuse used instead?

Fusible links (aka fusible link wire) is/was used specifically due to the design characteristics of the wiring system meaning that the electrical engineers wanted something that when stressed enough would fail in a way that would make the technician (mechanic) take a hard look at why it occurred as it indicates something is very wrong (significant short). IMO they didn't use a fuse because it can be easy replaced without further investigation thus putting the vehicle at further risk. Additionally a fusible link acts/operates differently than a fuse in that it is designed to "flex" a bit with load until it overheats and ultimately fails whereas a fuse will "pop" as soon as the load surpasses its limits.

On my cars I generally build a small replicable section of fusible link of which I make a couple of spares but I admit that I have also used a resettable circuit breaker in some builds. Obviously when the fusible link fails the car is dead in the water, however if the electrical system is designed right and not abused (hacked up) the fusible link should and does live for a very long time (think decades).
 
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Robbins

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fusible links...you need four wire size smaller than you load wire. So 8 gauge needs 12 gauge fusible link....no shorter than 5.5 inches and no longer than 6.5 so shoot for 6 in. long. When I make these up I set it up with an extra spare...but if you blow threw one....you need to fix the issue before hooking up the spare.
 

black64

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Fusible links are made to protect wire size specific ie 12awg wire would have 16 gage fusible link and these have hypolan insulation to withstand the higher amp temps with smaller gage wire. Hypolan insulation is used because it usually does not melt when there is a short and contains the copper under the insulation so it can't touch sheet metal when it shorts out. Do not use vinyl insulated wire for a fusible link. You can usually buy link wire from after market suppiers.
 
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