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One wire alternator wiring question

Snow Wolf

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Sorry for the redundant alternator post, but I'm not very experienced with wiring and have read a lot yesterday trying to figure this out. I'm currently in the process of putting the rebuilt 383 back into my 1969 Road Runner and putting a new engine wiring harness. I won't be adding any electrical components and the car doesn't have A/C. I'm converting the alternator to a one wire 65 amp Powermaster unit. I understand running the new wire to the either the starter relay or direct to the battery, but not sure what to do with the original black wire. I've read where some people have removed the alternator wire connector and used the wire to continue on to the horn relay, others have simply taped the end off, and others have hooked this back up to the new alternator. I had the dash restored by Auto Instruments and they converted the ammeter to a voltage gauge. I will be unwrapping the new harness to remove the unneeded wires for the regulator and ballast resister. I've read a lot about bulkhead issues and don't want to cause problems. What would be the proper way to deal with the original black wire? If removing this black wire from that, is the wire with the fusible link from the starter relay sufficient enough to supply the guage cluster and lighting system? Thanks in advance for your help.
 
There will be different opinions here regarding that original wire from the alternator. I chose to leave the wire in and leave the ammeter in place on my recent re-wire - and I used a new Powermaster alternator. The trick is to make sure everything is clean & tight in the terminals. I had replaced virtually everything, so I am aware of the condition.

Make sure the new alternator is grounded locally - I used the exhaust manifold stud as it was close. The alternator will be grounded by virtue of being physically bolted to the head, but a separate additional wire does no harm. Do please take particular care around the bulkhead connectors....especially where the black supply wire enters.....it may already be showing signs of heat.

Best of luck....and don't get too worried about the replies which I know are coming. :lol:

Eggshells.gif
 
Sorry for the redundant alternator post, but I'm not very experienced with wiring and have read a lot yesterday trying to figure this out. I'm currently in the process of putting the rebuilt 383 back into my 1969 Road Runner and putting a new engine wiring harness. I won't be adding any electrical components and the car doesn't have A/C. I'm converting the alternator to a one wire 65 amp Powermaster unit. I understand running the new wire to the either the starter relay or direct to the battery, but not sure what to do with the original black wire. I've read where some people have removed the alternator wire connector and used the wire to continue on to the horn relay, others have simply taped the end off, and others have hooked this back up to the new alternator. I had the dash restored by Auto Instruments and they converted the ammeter to a voltage gauge. I will be unwrapping the new harness to remove the unneeded wires for the regulator and ballast resister. I've read a lot about bulkhead issues and don't want to cause problems. What would be the proper way to deal with the original black wire? If removing this black wire from that, is the wire with the fusible link from the starter relay sufficient enough to supply the guage cluster and lighting system? Thanks in advance for your help.
 
Leave the wire but do not connect it to the stud. Then run the proper size wire with the proper size fuse to the starter relay battery stud.
 
I just added the new wiring harness from Evans wiring for a stock one wire harness replacement on my 65 Dodge ..I specified it will need to support Mopar electronic ignition. I did modify the ballest......car runs/charge fine.


"they converted the ammeter to a voltage gauge"..... This is new to me :rolleyes:

20230426_141458.jpg
 
I just added the new wiring harness from Evans wiring for a stock one wire harness replacement on my 65 Dodge ..I specified it will need to support Mopar electronic ignition. I did modify the ballest......car runs/charge fine.


"they converted the ammeter to a voltage gauge"..... This is new to me :rolleyes:

View attachment 1550683
Its done all the time. Ammeter is modified to be a voltmeter.
 
Yeap, is done all the time, by those afraid about how making it work still safe on its original design. because don’t want (or aren’t able) to understand the ammeter reading LOL.
 
Yeap, is done all the time, by those afraid about how making it work still safe on its original design. because don’t want (or aren’t able) to understand the ammeter reading LOL.
Being smart and proactive is not being afraid. Smart people do whats right for their liking. In this case the factory alternator feed wire is 12 ga. This size wire has a safe load which is 4.9 feet for 30 amps, 5.9 for 25 amps and 7.4 for 20 amps. Running a larger alternator taxes the under capacity wiring, connections and all the rest. Poster wants to safely add an one wire 65 amp alternator. He is doing it the right way by updating the wiring size and bypassing all the failure prone areas including the voltmeter conversion. Is he afraid? I don't think so. Is he smart? I think so. He gets an A in my book.
 
Being smart and proactive is not being afraid. Smart people do whats right for their liking. In this case the factory alternator feed wire is 12 ga. This size wire has a safe load which is 4.9 feet for 30 amps, 5.9 for 25 amps and 7.4 for 20 amps. Running a larger alternator taxes the under capacity wiring, connections and all the rest. Poster wants to safely add an one wire 65 amp alternator. He is doing it the right way by updating the wiring size and bypassing all the failure prone areas including the voltmeter conversion. Is he afraid? I don't think so. Is he smart? I think so. He gets an A in my book.
To whom are you are referring to?
BOB RENTON
 
Well, I never say to keep the factory setup, but just the original design. Original design with the propper upgrades. ;)
 
When I drove the car in high school, we had the alternator rebuilt by a local guy. I don't know what he did wrong, but I remember the ammeter started smoking. We took it to the guy and he ran a wire from the alternator to battery. Plus I've read about issues of the bulkhead melting. I like the simplicity of a one wire alternator and eliminating unneeded wires and potential fire hazards. The 65 amp was the smallest one wire alternator that I had found.
 
He didn’t fixed, just went for the easy and “patched” the problem. The real deal is fix the problem.

When you have a brakes fail, you fix it

When you have a bearing fail, you fix it

when you have a fuel fail, you fix it.

Nothing of those problems are patched when fixing.

why don’t take the same care on the electricity area?. The wiring in our cars is the most obvioused, abused and highjacked area of the car. Then ppl ask why get bigger fails appears later. This happens just because there is a lot of unknowledgement about it and is easy to patch like it is fixed… but is not.

You can’t take the power from any point, even less with an ammeter which must read the actual batt status. Every acc added must be CORRECTLY sourced. But for years this has been made incorrectly.
You can’t upgrade a batt without upgrade the alt first.
Connection conditions must be checked and mantenienced just like when you rebuild an engine, or replace disc/drums, especially after 20, 30, 40 years…

And about the alt capacity. We must remember amperes are requested by the devices, not sourced by the source just for free. So even with an alt able to feed up to 65 amps (or 100), doesn’t mean WILL do it. Wiring is set by the device demand not by the source capacity. Of course with better paths, less restrictions to feed.

A bulb sucking 0.5 amperes is conected to the same batt which feeds the starter motor, but the bulb gets 16 gauge wire and the starter motor 4 or 2 gauge. So is not the source but the device (or network) who sets the wiring gauge need.
 
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He didn’t fixed, just went for the easy and “patched” the problem. The real deal is fix the problem.

When you have a brakes fail, you fix it

When you have a bearing fail, you fix it

when you have a fuel fail, you fix it.

Nothing of those problems are patched when fixing.

why don’t take the same care on the electricity area?. The wiring in our cars is the most obvioused, abused and highjacked area of the car. Then ppl ask why get bigger fails appears later. This happens just because there is a lot of unknowledgement about it and is easy to patch like it is fixed… but is not.

You can’t take the power from any point, even less with an ammeter which must read the actual batt status. Every acc added must be CORRECTLY sourced. But for years this has been made incorrectly.
You can’t upgrade a batt without upgrade the alt first.
Connection conditions must be checked and mantenienced just like when you rebuild an engine, or replace disc/drums, especially after 20, 30, 40 years…

And about the alt capacity. We must remember amperes are requested by the devices, not sourced by the source just for free. So even with an alt able to feed up to 65 amps (or 100), doesn’t mean WILL do it. Wiring is set by the device demand not by the source capacity. Of course with better paths, less restrictions to feed.

A bulb sucking 0.5 amperes is conected to the same batt which feeds the starter motor, but the bulb gets 16 gauge wire and the starter motor 4 or 2 gauge. So is not the source but the device (or network) who sets the wiring gauge need.
More gibberish from an ammeter hugger.
When brakes fail or are inadequate you fix or upgrade. Is that a patch?
When a fuel system fails or is inadequate you fix it or upgrade. Is that a patch?
When a bearing fails or is inadequate you fix it or upgrade. Is that a patch?
When an engine fails from inadequate oil supply you fix or upgrade. Is that a patch?
The old wiring on these cars is old and inadequate period. You can make everything just perfect connection wise but its still inadequate. 12 ga. is undersized for any load over 20 amps with its length considered.
So any repair modifications, rerouting, Etc. you would suggest would be considers a patch according to your words. Dont step any harder on your rodent.
 
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Dunno if you noticed you are confirming my statement ;)
No I did not? This is what you said he was doing. Quote[He didn’t fixed, just went for the easy and “patched” the problem. The real deal is fix the problem.]Quote What he is doing is not a patch and it fixes what his upgraded alternator should have. Any other loads or wiring is a totally different discussion.
 
When I drove the car in high school, we had the alternator rebuilt by a local guy. I don't know what he did wrong, but I remember the ammeter started smoking. We took it to the guy and he ran a wire from the alternator to battery. Plus I've read about issues of the bulkhead melting. I like the simplicity of a one wire alternator and eliminating unneeded wires and potential fire hazards. The 65 amp was the smallest one wire alternator that I had found.
The best advice is: to TOTALLY ignore any information stated or professed by a certain forum member,who goes by the name of N*********. PM me if you wish.....
BOB RENTON
 
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