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Replacing Master Cylinder

JJordan1173

Well-Known Member
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Hello All,

Noticed a small leak on the back side of the master cylinder on the 64 Fury. Needs replacing. Failed getting it off this afternoon, could use some advice..

Because the master cylinder nut access is in the cab under the steering colum behind the pedals and impossible to access (see photos -they are the corroded ones) I figured I would remove the entire plate under the hood (no brake booster) but again the rust. Nuts are rusted to bolt and both turn when trying to remove the nut. Any suggestions? Thx.

I PB Blasted and I am thinking about holding the bolt with a wrench and trying to wrestle off the nut tomorrow. I would rather not go primitive though.

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Well you're not going to get it off otherwise. The plate is just a reinforcement. The 4 studs on the master go through the pedal frame and those 4 nuts have to come off. You can't just pull them thru...
 
inline tube or fine lines has a kit with a brass block and pre-bent lines. For 67 converion.
 
Use a deep socket and wobble or ujoint and a long extension. 3/8" drive. Soak the hell out of everything with your favorite penetrant.

Soak that brake line, too.

No need for a dual master cylinder. IMHO
 
Use a deep socket and wobble or ujoint and a long extension. 3/8" drive. Soak the hell out of everything with your favorite penetrant.

Soak that brake line, too.

No need for a dual master cylinder. IMHO
Thanks for the specs! Will do.
 
Douse the bolts with Gibbs lubricant oil. You'll be amazed how well it works. It puts pb blaster to shame.
 
Hold the head with a
wrench. Blast the nuts with
penetrant.
Break out the 1/2" drive
impact, an extension, and
a wobble socket.
They'll either come loose
or twist off. In which case
you can drive 'em out with
a punch and replace with
new. Don't fight it.
Years of working on stuff
as much as 80 years old
is the mother of shortcuts.
I've disassembled 2 1940
Dodge/Plymouth trucks
and learned the 'ol impact
and my Makita die grinder
could make short work
of weathered hardware
with zero damage to the
parts they hold together.
 
Last edited:
Use a deep socket and wobble or ujoint and a long extension. 3/8" drive. Soak the hell out of everything with your favorite penetrant.

Soak that brake line, too.

No need for a dual master cylinder. IMHO
Just curious... why might a person not go with a dual master cylinder? It seems like a basic safety requirement.
 
Just curious... why might a person not go with a dual master cylinder? It seems like a basic safety requirement.
I have heard this point/argument made as well. I would be interested to hear the arguments on both sides.

I am keeping this car 100% stock, so for me it is less about better or worse, but about restoration.
 
Can you afford the loss if you total or under insured? I don't want to lose $30k or $40k, risk is small. It saved me once because of a unforgivable brake job mistake I made.
 
Slam that parking brake pedal to the floor. Yours works correct...

A Superbird and a Daytona smacked in the past 6 months due to "brake failure". Of course both have dual reservoirs. If you don't check fluid levels or basic functions anything can fail...
 
Unless it is a 100 point trailer queen show car, I would not hesitate to upgrade to a dual master. I had one of them fail on me once. It cost me a complete front end. With body work and paint over 2 grand and that was many years ago. I realize there are many other things that can go wrong but that one only a fool makes.
 
I don't think a parking brake is a good backup either.
It's not a normal response so you lose 2 or 3 seconds or more trying to locate the pedal.
And if your brakes do fail and then you only have rear brakes from the parking assembly.
Try stopping from 50mph or more with just the parking brake you will quickly get to the lockup point on the rears and the car will hardly slow down.
Then the rear will try and kick out on one side or the other.
It's a bad feeling. Try it and report back.
People call it an emergency brake but I hope I never have that emergency.
 
I have 66 and 67 b body's.
I also would go to the dual reservoir. It's hard to trust any brake parts made today, let alone a single pot.
 
As a last resort you could grind the heads off the studs on the firewall side and punch them through or tack them with a welder so they don’t spin.
 
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