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Chrysler 8 3/4 Axle bearing and Seal R&R...A How To

threewood

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I'm in the process of getting my rear end cleaned up and installing new seals and bearings so I figured I would take some time and document my process. A press is almost a must have and my HF 12 ton has paid for itself and then some. Well worth the money imho.

1. Here is the old assembly (L and R are same procedure, only difference is the adjuster)
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2. Get a cutoff tool and cut a slit in the collar. You will also cut into the bearing, no biggie as it is being replaced. The collar and bearing have to come off to replace the outer seal.
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3. Get a cold chisel, gloves and eye pro and start chiseling into the slit. Obviously use a vise or anvil under it. It doesn't take hulk like hammering. The collar will stretch and slide off. You do not need to cut all the way through.
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4. Now, what I do is cut a groove in the bearing shoulder and cut off as much of the cage as I can. With the groove I can pull the bearings out with a magnet. When all the bearings are out I pull out and snip the cage in half and remove.

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5. Now we have access to the inner race. Cut a groove in it as well. An angle keeps you from cutting through the retainer. It doesn't need to be super deep. Once it is cut, use the cold chisel and hammer on it until it starts to spin. It is now split. You do not need to wail on this either, just plenty of medium taps will crack it as it is pretty hard steel. Wear eye pro at a minimum.
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6. Clean everything up and make sure the seal contact surface is clean and not grooved too bad. You can clean them up with scotchbrite pads or very very fine sandpaper. Replace the outer seal in the retainer. I use a seal tool set from HF which has all the correct sizes.
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7. Now is the perfect time to replace any wheel studs. These are the only leftys left on the car so I am going to swap them over to righty. I press them out with a bronze bushing so they aren't damaged as someone may still have a use for them.
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8. Lets get it back together. Retainer goes on first!!!!!! Don't forget this and make sure it is in the correct orientation. Then we drop the new bearing in place and press it home.
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9. Once the bearing is seated against the shoulder, pull the axle out and drop the collar on the shaft and press it home as well.
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10. All done. I'll probably update this as I get everything else together.
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Nice write up! To bad people can't wait till the end before they make comments.
 
It was very informative, I liked it, I had to figure that out all by my self last month, you don't get that in a service manual, Ma Mopar didn't give you many pics either. Great compilation.
 
Please let us know your procedure for packing the bearings with grease also.
 
Please let us know your procedure for packing the bearings with grease also.

Could have packed them with a grease cone before install but didn't think of it. I have a grease needle that works well to fill all the cavities. Just squeeze it in one end till it comes out the other.
 
Why didn't you "press" off the old one??
If you look in the service manual, it requires a specialized tool I don't have and isn't necessary when using the cut and split technique. There is little to no room to get anything behind the bearing to press or pull and they are on there tight.
 
Threewood, what axle housing do you have in your '62 or isn't that from that car?

One of these can work in a press for bearing removal. You still have to be careful not to damage the retainer plate.
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Thanks for the "How To" thread!
 
Threewood, what axle housing do you have in your '62 or isn't that from that car?

One of these can work in a press for bearing removal. You still have to be careful not to damage the retainer plate.
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Thanks for the "How To" thread!

I've seen those but don't have one in my toolbox. This rear end is out of my 69 GTX, 741. My 62 also has a 741 but has tapered axles.
 
I use a torch to heat up the bearing retainer collar but have used a grinder too. In many cases, the grinder created enough heat to expand it but if it doesn't, a flat chisel will usually do the trick. Also, be careful when you use a chisel on the bearing as particles from the bearing or from the chisel can penetrate your skin too....even through your clothing.
 
Great how to! Just changed third member to see if the one in the car was the noise from rear or axle bearings. Wanted to try 4.10's anyway Had a 3.23's one legger in the car, will put a suregrip in it while it's out.
One comment the factory service manual says to put a strip of metal around axle seal surface so you don't hit it with the grinder, oops.
 
Great how to! Just changed third member to see if the one in the car was the noise from rear or axle bearings. Wanted to try 4.10's anyway Had a 3.23's one legger in the car, will put a suregrip in it while it's out.
One comment the factory service manual says to put a strip of metal around axle seal surface so you don't hit it with the grinder, oops.
I have 3.23s in my 62 with an Eaton Trutrac and really like it. Street car and it turns 3k @ 73mph so it is pretty good on the highway. Would like to try something lower to see how well it runs.

Anything wrapped around the axle is a safety measure and should be employed. Take it slow and remember, you don't need to cut all the way through. The chisel will do the job.
 
I've used a few methods, the chisel like you mention, grinding one side paper thin until it turns purple or just expanding it with heat until it pulls right off like Cranky mentioned. Yes you can buy a tool to press it off but everybody has a grinder lol. Nice write up.
 
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