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Door Hinge Rebuilding question

dan juhasz

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On 67 Belvedere door hinges. They don’t utilize bushings. I disassembled and bead blasted the parts after I drove out the old pin. The wear is in the inside part of the hinge not the pin. The dorman kits I purchased have bushings. I’m a little hesitant the drill the worn half of the hinge and install the bushings. Has anyone ever done this repair before. Any suggestions or advice welcomed.
Dan
 
Lots of threads on this. Don't try it. Send them to the guy.
 
I sent my 67 hinges to MoparLeo and they came back very nice.
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Last edited:
Saw this on forabodiesonly.com.

 
A second vote for this. I’ve used a couple of his kits and they work great. No added bushings.
His kits use bushings plus they are out of stock. I mailed my hinges out this morning to Leo. I’ve used him in the past ,his repairs are excellent. Having read a lot of the past threads on this subject and taking mine apart and bead blasting them to inspect I came to the realization that these lowers are not designed for the installation of brass bushings. I also concur that with the weight of these doors the bushings would be loose in no time at all.
 
3/8" bolts with long shoulders is the old school way we did it before bushing kits or any other methods were commonly available.
 
Yes, Being a Machinist, those bushings are definitely a no-no. Too soft.
If you can't ream the holes in one set up all together for 100% clean up
and machine a couple of pins to fit snug, send them out and get them
done right.
 
Thanks for the info, FBBO!

This thread was very timely. I have the same Dorman kit that the OP described and I was considering installing it this weekend. After reading through this thread, I have decided to go the MoparLeo route.
 
I have also been a machinist in my career. I agree that MoparLeo does a great job of rebuilding door hinges. My question is why not machine some steel bushings (instead of bronze bushings) to press into the hinge after it has been reamed out to a size that fits the OD of the new bushing. This would allow keeping the stock size pins. Also, the bushing wouldn't need a flange and could be staked in using a center punch. Just a thought?
Terry W.
 
I have also been a machinist in my career. I agree that MoparLeo does a great job of rebuilding door hinges. My question is why not machine some steel bushings (instead of bronze bushings) to press into the hinge after it has been reamed out to a size that fits the OD of the new bushing. This would allow keeping the stock size pins. Also, the bushing wouldn't need a flange and could be staked in using a center punch. Just a thought?
Terry W.

I've been looking for some steel bushings for that exact reason. I have a really worn set of hinges that need to be reamed to 7/16 because the inner hinge holes are oblong. Was looking at drill bushings. I can find the right 7/16 OD but the largest ID for that bushing is .315. Stock pins are .340. Maybe heating up the drill bushing to remove the hardening and reaming the ID to 11/32 might work.
 
You can do all kinds of crazy stuff if you want but my car has 40k original miles on it and the hinges
have little wear. I fixed them in 20 minutes with an oversized reamer and made two oversized pins.
I figure I can go for another 40k without worrying about it. That means I'll be DEAD!
 
In that case I would try a local smaller machine shop. If the springs are O.K., and
the only issue is sloppy pin fit, They could put the hinge in a machine vice in a
Bridgeport mill and ream the holes until they clean up. Then make two pins up.
 
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