Rototiller recommendation.

General Discussion

  1. F4R/T

    F4R/T Well-Known Member

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    Sucks to hear Briggs got taken over by an investment company... same thing I believe happened to the old tecumseh company too.
     
  2. Bill76

    Bill76 Well-Known Member

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    Hire someone to do it.
     
  3. Chargered

    Chargered Well-Known Member

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    I do a lot of gardening and bought a used Troy Bilt about 13 years ago. It was well used when I bought it and it works great and is still going strong. My Mom has the same basic model that I have and we have been using it on her farm for the last 40 years. You can't beat these machines. Get the big one called the Troy Bilt Horse. You could search Fakebook or Craigslist for a used one.
     
  4. Don selleck

    Don selleck FBBO Gold Member FBBO Gold Member

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    yes tecumseh products peerless gear, was sold out then that company I believe went under and was taken over by some other company in wisconsin. my dad and grand dad both worked there, they were tooled up in ww2 and made 50 caliber aircraft machine gun bullets. my dad had one he got from his dad that did some of the machining, the slug was about 4 inches long with a screw cap tip on the end and the slug was hollow, i assume for explosives. thought that was way cool when I was kid. The factory has been mostly torn down, another one gone.
     
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    • 74charger07ram

      74charger07ram Well-Known Member

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      I have a 1985 Troy Built rear tine 8 horse Briggs. Wouldn't sell it at all. After it sets two or three months I pull the rope twice and it starts. It is electric start but don't need it. The newer Troybuilt is not very good.
       
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      • Slap Stick

        Slap Stick Well-Known Member

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        Yep, Peerless was sold to Husqvarna and Tecumseh was shut down then sold to another company who entered into an agreement to build Tecumseh engines again.
        You could usually tell when a Tecumseh shut down. It would make a final pop out the exhaust.
         
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        • Nate S

          Nate S Well-Known Member

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          I have a Craftsman that’s probably 20 years old, works great, use it every year. No going to break grass well with it though, for that I’ll use the Farmall, then break it up with the rototiller.
           
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          • Chargered

            Chargered Well-Known Member

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            Don't get the front tine tiller, make sure you go for a rear tine. They work much better.
             
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            • Fran Blacker

              Fran Blacker FBBO Gold Member FBBO Gold Member

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              Don't know the ground is in Washington but here it is full of rocks. Rented a troybuilt to breakup some ground rocks and roots O'boy. It was like wrestling a 900 lb gorilla that didn't get tired. Ached for few days.
               
            • sam dupont

              sam dupont Well-Known Member

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              They are like running a packer. You want to hang on loosely, not manhandle them. With rocks, let it buck, as the tiller moves ahead leaving the rock a foot behind, get your toe under the rock and flick it out of the garden. It's amazing how a small rock can make them jump. Not much you can do for roots with a walk behind. Going down in steps is faster than taking big bites.
               
            • BLK 68 R/T

              BLK 68 R/T FBBO Gold Member FBBO Gold Member

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              There is a fair amount of rocks around here in the soil. More so if you are in the bottom of a valley. I’m up on the hillside so hopefully won’t run into too many. Friend of mine has an older Troy Built, think he said it’s the Horse model. I’ll give it a try next weekend hopefully and go from there.

              Appreciate all the feedback from everyone thus far. :thumbsup:
               
            • Fran Blacker

              Fran Blacker FBBO Gold Member FBBO Gold Member

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              I'm not talking about rocks 3 or 4 inches. These you need to dig out. New England is famous for rock walls. Hundred years or more ago my area was farmed. Farmers made rock walls, we'd walk on them, they were breaking down, we didn't help.
               
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