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why you don't use PVC for air line

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rated for 200 psi air compressor max output 90 this piece is 3ft long still missing at least 4 ft
 
Why didn't you use the SCH-40 3/4" pipe that's rated at 480 psi??? NEVER use the thin wall stuff for air....
 
I have had 1" pvc sch 40 in my shop air line for years and have never had any problems.
 
PVC is notorious for cracking, it's a brittle plastic. It gets weaker with heat, so you'd better have a good aftercooler on a large compressor.

Much better and safer is high-density polyethylene (HDPE) air line. It isn't brittle, won't be affected by common lubricants associated with air compressors and is usually blue for identification.
 
Did all of the lines in a friend's body shop over twenty years ago with Sch 40 and not a problem. I made sure that all of the lines

were overhead and everything is pitched back to the air receiver so moisture always ends up in the tank. He runs 110psi. The drops

come out of a Tee and go up before going through four elbows to re-direct the lines down to the drops.
 
PVC is affected by UV long term not good
In BC Canada we can not use PVC as it is brittle and if hit by some thing it can shatter and is like flying glass when it explodes
 
PEX is the ticket!

I did my entire shop with PEX and copper drops. I did a pressure test on a 2' section at 140PSI, dropped everything in the world on it, cinder blocks, anvils, beat it with a hammer.. nothing. When it did finally fail, it just split a little and hissed out, granted, it's all behind drywall but you can't go wrong with it. Cheap too!
 
Reading that schedule-80 spec sheet from Harvel, it mentions nothing about being allowed for compressed gasses. The pressure rating is for water, which is a constant dimension fluid so it doesn't expand through a rupture like compressed gasses do.

The section on the left of that page has a menu that includes 'Testing' in which is specifically warns against any testing with air in the system during a water test, and Caution: Compressed air or gases must never be used for testing of rigid PVC and CPVC piping systems

Further, the 'Cautions Areas' on that page specifically warns that GF Harvel does not recommend the use of PVC or CPVC piping products for the testing, transport, or storage of compressed air or gases

It also brings the warning that PVC and CPVC piping may not be compatible with oils in the system from air compressors.
 
I use Copper piping.

Do not use PVC! It's for carrying uncompressed liquids or gases, not compressed anything. Good to hear no one got hurt.
 
I use type 4 copper with soldiered joints. Brazed joints not required for under 2oo psi
 
I always use 3/4 black iron pipe and fittings. It's just the right way to do it.

Well said!! Why anyone would contemplate using PVC piping for high pressure lines is beyond me. Steel or Copper....do the job properly.
 
I use galvanized steel pipe for all my air lines. I figure there are much better uses for PVC pipe than 150 lbs. of air.
 
Hmmm,
Lets see...
1997 I installed my set-up.
Quincy BIG compressor and 3/4" schedule 40

SHOULD I BE REPLACING MINE TOO?

NOTE: Interestingly enough, after a second viewing of your damaged PVC 3/4" Schedule 40 pipe I notice some "Blue" in very close proximity to your damaged area.
Did you use a "marker" to highlight the damage OR is it left over residue from either "Hot Blue" Glue or Primer?

If so, the chemical in the Hot Blue Glue weakens the surface area on the PVC pipe.

The maker of Jet Hot Blue specifically states not to have any "GLUE" on surronding area, only the joint. It states to wipe off any excess. (Read the label)

To me, thiis is exactly why your pipe failed in that spot.
 
NOTE: Interestingly enough, after a second viewing of your damaged PVC 3/4" Schedule 40 pipe I notice some "Blue" in very close proximity to your damaged area.
Did you use a "marker" to highlight the damage OR is it left over residue from either "Hot Blue" Glue or Primer?

If so, the chemical in the Hot Blue Glue weakens the surface area on the PVC pipe.

The maker of Jet Hot Blue specifically states not to have any "GLUE" on surronding area, only the joint. It states to wipe off any excess. (Read the label)

To me, thiis is exactly why your pipe failed in that spot.
 
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