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Hip Replacement and stick cars.

440 4 speed

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I would like to know if anyone with a hip replacement, had to change their pressure plate and clutch. If so, what did you use?
Correction!
I was not thinking about a hydraulic clutch. Experience I had was they weren’t fast enough to enjoy a ride down the track.
 
Last edited:
Switch to a Diaphragm clutch and remove the over center spring under the dash.
 
You know, I thought about this awhile back when I converted my car to a manual transmission.
I won't be this nimble and capable forever.
What about when I'm old and my own hips or back are sore? I thought about shifting when I broke my shoulder last year.
The hydraulic clutch is a real great thing. Pedal effort is quite tolerable.
 
I agree with Kern. Go hydraulic.
 
Thank you everyone. I was thinking hydraulic. I certainly won’t be running it down the track very often.
Has anyone experienced this situation.
I won’t even think about doing it by myself. Also have a mechanic son who is involved with drag racing.
 
I have a new left hip and have no problem with a B&B plate. I have used a Mcleod Street-Twin and my current plate is a Centerforce 2 with a Mcleod 600 series disc and I love that one.
Still use mechanical linkage, cant stand hydraulic units especially the TO bearing rigs. If something goes wrong you are stranded but with mechanical linkage you can still find stuff to make it work.
I might add that if you have trouble with your clutch hip then your doctor screwed up. Had my left hip done over ten years ago with zero issues.
Gus
 
My brother and I are building a car for my Dad and he broke his hip 2 months ago. We were wondering if the 4 speed planned should switch to a automatic.. It is a 62 409 impala. It also has manual brakes and steering.
I told him it will be like physical therapy. The dual quads are for neck therapy. :p

Still concerned though about the 4 speed as he gets older.
 
I had my clutch leg hip replaced in late January of 2021. I was able to drive my Satellite by that May (the usual time I bring it out of winter hibernation) with no change to the clutch at all. It's a Centerforce.
 
I slipped on black ice at my work’s parking lot… should have sued. :( Anyway, my clutch knee sounds like a big sheet of bubble wrap when I decent the stairs. I’m putting a hydraulic in the GTX I’m building.
 
I've had two knee replacements and three new shoulders...two on the right.

I'm still driving big trucks but we only use the clutch at a full stop... But my Coronet will be reborn with a juice clutch and an 833.

I hope to post the conversion on my YouTube channel soon.
 
I've had two knee replacements and three new shoulders...two on the right.

I'm glad that you clarified that.

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My brother and I are building a car for my Dad and he broke his hip 2 months ago. We were wondering if the 4 speed planned should switch to a automatic.. It is a 62 409 impala. It also has manual brakes and steering.
I told him it will be like physical therapy. The dual quads are for neck therapy. :p

Still concerned though about the 4 speed as he gets older.
Although this thread is addressing hip issues and clutching, there are plenty of other lower body performance problems that can affect the driving process in later years. My wife has dealt with peripheral neuropathy for 20 years, which can affect both clutch and throttle legs. I parted with two GTXs with manual steering and brakes in recent years. I started using hand controls for trips out of town, after late effects of early polio compromised my ability to maintain pressure against a strong throttle return spring. Power steering and brakes are a most if using this set up with a vintage B body. My wife had a hip replacement 10 years ago, and her ability to use a clutch is still 100%.

I drove my Peterbilt 379 with a dry clutch and 18 speed for a full year after I started using mobility aids part time. With my situation, the clutch was never an issue, but the throttle was, and clinched my decision to retire.
 
The car in question is a 1 of 132 440 mag 4 speed Dana car , OEM restoration.. the idea of a hydraulic clutch wasn't even a consideration.. I thought.
 
Although this thread is addressing hip issues and clutching, there are plenty of other lower body performance problems that can affect the driving process in later years. My wife has dealt with peripheral neuropathy for 20 years, which can affect both clutch and throttle legs. I parted with two GTXs with manual steering and brakes in recent years. I started using hand controls for trips out of town, after late effects of early polio compromised my ability to maintain pressure against a strong throttle return spring. Power steering and brakes are a most if using this set up with a vintage B body. My wife had a hip replacement 10 years ago, and her ability to use a clutch is still 100%.

I drove my Peterbilt 379 with a dry clutch and 18 speed for a full year after I started using mobility aids part time. With my situation, the clutch was never an issue, but the throttle was, and clinched my decision to retire.
A 379 only requires a brick on the go pedal!!!!
 
Thank you everyone. I was thinking hydraulic. I certainly won’t be running it down the track very often.
Has anyone experienced this situation.
I won’t even think about doing it by myself. Also have a mechanic son who is involved with drag racing.
Mirror the experience for
my situation. Went from
a four speed to an auto
after an accident left me
with no feeling in my foot.
Couldn't tell if my foot was
on the pedal, much less
the strength to engage it.
Hopefully (even with a
hydraulic clutch) you don't
experience any discomfort
while rowing those gears.
Sometimes it's the repetition
rather than the force applied.
Your seat may have
something to say about
your pain also.
Agree with others here,
have a mechanic do the
work for you.
 
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