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Mounting an Electric Fuel Pump

Charger Fan

FBBO Gold Member
FBBO Gold Member
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Going to install an electric fuel pump in my 440 Charger to get the system primed and fill the bowl. The car is not my daily driver, I usually get it out on the weekends or every other weekend. Takes lots of cranking to get bowl filled before she'll fire off. I am going to keep the mechanical pump and use the electric as a turn on for prime and then shut it off. Any body do something like this and if so, where did you mount the pump and what brand have you had luck with?
 

Mount it back by the tank. Those pumps are pushers. Wire it to the fusebox with an inline fuse holder and a momentary switch.
 
Mount by the fuel tank. You need to look at a pump that gets the job done. I have to wonder why you're getting drain back. More folks will help out better than myself.
 
Mount by the fuel tank. You need to look at a pump that gets the job done. I have to wonder why you're getting drain back. More folks will help out better than myself.
Probably no drain back. Evaporation is an issue with the puppy pee gas we have nowdays.
 
Probably no drain back. Evaporation is an issue with the puppy pee gas we have nowdays.
Your right gas sucks today. I remember when pumping gas the pump handle would get cold but that was back in the day.
 
Make sure the pump you buy can have fuel drawn through it if it isn't running.
 
Remember, ethanol boils at 173°. How hot is your engine when you shut it off? Well over that. Gasoline dissipates at 140 degrees Fahrenheit, which means the higher the temperature, the faster it will vaporize.
 
I had exactly this on my 440 6pac in my 70 Challenger RT. I used a Holley red pump and wired via a relay to a toggle switch. I mounted right in front of the tank off the brace that the shocks mount to. It worked ok and did what I needed it to but seemed to add a degree of complexity I didn't feel I needed and eventually removed it.
 
The fuels of today evaporates very quickly. On my RR, I mounted a Holley Gerotor (QUIET) pump next to the fuel tank. About a dozen years ago, or so. Problem solved.
 
Carter makes a economically priced pump with filter that I installed on my 65 Coronet-stock, for that very situation. Works well.
Carter P90091: Universal In Line Electric Fuel Pump - JEGS
Mike
IMG_2495.JPG
 
Carter makes a economically priced pump with filter that I installed on my 65 Coronet-stock, for that very situation. Works well.
Carter P90091: Universal In Line Electric Fuel Pump - JEGS
Mike
View attachment 1523451
I would never run that amount of rubber line especially in an area that is cooked with the exhaust heat and not easily inspected. This setup is a good way to burn your car up as todays rubbers dry rot quickly even tires can not be sold legally after so many months.
 
Carter makes a economically priced pump with filter that I installed on my 65 Coronet-stock, for that very situation. Works well.
Carter P90091: Universal In Line Electric Fuel Pump - JEGS
Mike
View attachment 1523451
I used this same pump on your recommendation. Initially it was just for priming on a momentary switch . I lost the mechanical pump due to a pushrod failure, and now I am running it as my only fuel pump. I mounted mine along the rocker where the stock fuel line ran. No problems so far.

IMG_20230326_150827706.jpg
 
I used this same pump on your recommendation. Initially it was just for priming on a momentary switch . I lost the mechanical pump due to a pushrod failure, and now I am running it as my only fuel pump. I mounted mine along the rocker where the stock fuel line ran. No problems so far.

View attachment 1523643
I'm glad to be of help!
Mike
 
I would never run that amount of rubber line especially in an area that is cooked with the exhaust heat and not easily inspected. This setup is a good way to burn your car up as todays rubbers dry rot quickly even tires can not be sold legally after so many months.
I will let you know when the car burns up.
Mike
 
I will let you know when the car burns up.
Mike
Perfect!!! It’s why NHRA checks this stuff it’s a fire hazard and puts legitimate builders cars at risk.. Don’t hate the messenger.

Edit: I will remove my real thoughts posted earlier

1694533650411.jpeg
 
Last edited:
Perfect!!! It’s why NHRA checks this stuff it’s a fire hazard and puts legitimate builders cars at risk.. Don’t hate the messenger.

Edit: I will remove my real thoughts posted earlier

View attachment 1523997
I fully understand the reasons for the minimum hose rule. Any tiny length of hose can pose a risk. How many tens of millions of cars and trucks came out of Detroit with hoses? Evidently the need for vibration elimination overrules the risk :).
Mike
 
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