We Bet F-150 Lightning's Range Is under 100 Miles when Towing at the Max

Richard Cranium

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100 mile range towing a trailer =​


5HO.gif

Ford promises EPA ratings of 230 and 300 miles, but towing and hauling near the claimed 10,000-pound maximum is going to seriously cut into those figures.

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BY DAVE VANDERWERP
MAY 20, 2021

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FORD

  • Ford estimates that range for the 2022 F-150 Lightning electric pickup will be 230 miles for trucks with the standard battery and 300 miles on trucks with the extended-range pack.
  • The truck uses height sensors at each corner to estimate payload and adjust range predictions accordingly.
  • However, we estimate that towing anywhere near the Lightning's stated 10,000-pound maximum tow rating will lead to highway range in the double digits.
Range typically occupies an outsized chunk of the conversation on any new EV. But, in the case of the F-150 Lightning, which has the bestselling pickup's usual healthy scoop of towing and hauling capabilities, things get even more complicated than normal.
Ford is claiming that the range figures for its electric pickup will come in at 230 miles and 300 miles, depending on whether the standard-range (which we estimate can hold 115.0 kWh) or extended-range battery pack (150.0 kWh, same caveat) is beneath the bed. Those are EPA predictions, specifically EPA combined figures, in lightly loaded conditions.

Although the Lightning is aided by the aerodynamic effects of its flat underbody, when running at real highway speeds there's no tricking the air molecules, and a bluff truck is going to suffer. In our highway range testing, which we conduct at a steady 75 mph, we typically see a range number that's about 20 percent below the EPA figure. Using that same bogey, which is probably generous in the case of a full-size pickup, would put the Lightning in the 180-to-240-mile zone for what you might achieve on a road trip.
In a recent towing test with another EV, lugging a 3859-pound boat at 70 mph chopped its range in half compared to a run at the same speed sans trailer. Applying these results to the F-150 means that towing a modest trailer would put the highway range at roughly 100 to 125 miles, depending on the pack. Towing anywhere near the 10,000-pound maximum rating on XLT and Lariat models (with the maximum trailer tow package and extended-range battery) at highway speeds, we believe you'd be hard pressed to exceed double-digit miles. We'd take that bet, in fact.


Utilizing the Lightning's payload capabilities, which are 1800 pounds for the extended-range battery and 2000 pounds for the smaller pack will put you somewhere between these two extremes. And those figures both include the up-to-400 pounds that can be stowed in the large and handy front trunk.
At least there's some smart technology to help adjust the range prediction shown to the driver in day-to-day use. As launched on the 2021 F-150, the Lightning uses a height sensor at each corner to estimate the load in the bed or on the trailer hitch and preemptively adjusts down the range predictions accordingly.
The old adage "your mileage may vary" is very apropos when discussing EVs. And the F-150 Lightning's, because of its tough-truck capabilities, will vary more than most.
 

mopar 3 B

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You better have real good cell coverage if traveling northern NM and a even better auto club card. We traveled 270 miles last November without even a fuel station in sight.
 

Hey-O

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Thank God they didn't use the cigarette lighter.......... They would have gone 350 feet less!!
 

Don Frelier

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I wonder how far you could go if you trailered a diesel generator with a 250 gallon tank of diesel?
Or a trailer full of batteries?
A small fission reactor?
The possibilites are endless...
 

mopar 3 B

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Maybe Ford needed to go the true electric route and cover the body with millions of solar cells. So it's battery would charge while sitting in the middle of nowhere. Still faster than a covered wagon if the battery will complete charge in 8 days.
 

Cranky

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My 2500 diesel will go 500 miles....and has pulled down 25mpg before. Towing 4000 lbs the mpg goes to 17-18. Screw that electric crap.
 

mopar 3 B

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Towing 4000 lbs is like pulling nothing at all. Not sure when reality will settle in for some. But this is still crazy crap.
 

Nxcoupe

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Don't forget running the ac, lights on, wipers on, and radio bumping, along with gps telling you where you are going. Lol. Those mileage ranges are 'estimates' without any of those things working. Starting from a dead stop uses the most power.
They've already announced there is a battery shortage and Lithium is in short supply as well as 1000 times what it cost a little while ago.
This is a mess wishful, fantasy thinking has gotten us into.
 

mopar 3 B

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Wish they would test it in the mountains at 6% grade for 10 miles or more. The 45 mile per hour head wind on the travel trailer would also be a good test. Not everywhere is flat land with no wind.
 

joe smith

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Wish they would test it in the mountains at 6% grade for 10 miles or more. The 45 mile per hour head wind on the travel trailer would also be a good test. Not everywhere is flat land with no wind.
Hwy 80 through Wyoming,
 

mopar 3 B

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Sheeet, it will take 4 days to pass through wyoming due to "charge" time....
It may stimulate rural communities in ways not seen in 80 years. Other than we don't want the idiots around. More revenue could be made with installation of slow charger's. There maybe something yet to parting money and fools.
 

Budnicks

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100 mile range towing a trailer =​


View attachment 1295244

Ford promises EPA ratings of 230 and 300 miles, but towing and hauling near the claimed 10,000-pound maximum is going to seriously cut into those figures.

View attachment 1295245
BY DAVE VANDERWERP
MAY 20, 2021

VIEW PHOTOS
View attachment 1295246
FORD
  • Ford estimates that range for the 2022 F-150 Lightning electric pickup will be 230 miles for trucks with the standard battery and 300 miles on trucks with the extended-range pack.
  • The truck uses height sensors at each corner to estimate payload and adjust range predictions accordingly.
  • However, we estimate that towing anywhere near the Lightning's stated 10,000-pound maximum tow rating will lead to highway range in the double digits.
Range typically occupies an outsized chunk of the conversation on any new EV. But, in the case of the F-150 Lightning, which has the bestselling pickup's usual healthy scoop of towing and hauling capabilities, things get even more complicated than normal.
Ford is claiming that the range figures for its electric pickup will come in at 230 miles and 300 miles, depending on whether the standard-range (which we estimate can hold 115.0 kWh) or extended-range battery pack (150.0 kWh, same caveat) is beneath the bed. Those are EPA predictions, specifically EPA combined figures, in lightly loaded conditions.

Although the Lightning is aided by the aerodynamic effects of its flat underbody, when running at real highway speeds there's no tricking the air molecules, and a bluff truck is going to suffer. In our highway range testing, which we conduct at a steady 75 mph, we typically see a range number that's about 20 percent below the EPA figure. Using that same bogey, which is probably generous in the case of a full-size pickup, would put the Lightning in the 180-to-240-mile zone for what you might achieve on a road trip.
In a recent towing test with another EV, lugging a 3859-pound boat at 70 mph chopped its range in half compared to a run at the same speed sans trailer. Applying these results to the F-150 means that towing a modest trailer would put the highway range at roughly 100 to 125 miles, depending on the pack. Towing anywhere near the 10,000-pound maximum rating on XLT and Lariat models (with the maximum trailer tow package and extended-range battery) at highway speeds, we believe you'd be hard pressed to exceed double-digit miles. We'd take that bet, in fact.
Utilizing the Lightning's payload capabilities, which are 1800 pounds for the extended-range battery and 2000 pounds for the smaller pack will put you somewhere between these two extremes. And those figures both include the up-to-400 pounds that can be stowed in the large and handy front trunk.
At least there's some smart technology to help adjust the range prediction shown to the driver in day-to-day use. As launched on the 2021 F-150, the Lightning uses a height sensor at each corner to estimate the load in the bed or on the trailer hitch and preemptively adjusts down the range predictions accordingly.
The old adage "your mileage may vary" is very apropos when discussing EVs. And the F-150 Lightning's, because of its tough-truck capabilities, will vary more than most.
about what I suspected, a lil' less
:thankyou: @Richard Cranium
 

joe smith

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It may stimulate rural communities in ways not seen in 80 years. Other than we don't want the idiots around. More revenue could be made with installation of slow charger's. There maybe something yet to parting money and fools.
You sound like the California developers taking over Montana on "Yellowstone"...
 

mopar 3 B

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You sound like the California developers taking over Montana on "Yellowstone"...
I did not say I approved. In factor I would rather they stayed out of these areas entirely. Because instead of enjoying them for what they are. Will heck no we need this, got to have that. Pretty soon the hole area's changed and screwed.
 

440 PHIXX

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Yeah... this **** is a joke. And electric rates just went up 48%!!! In “Scranton” Joe’s “hometown”.
 

QuebecRollin

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I’m wondering if it makes more sense to buy this truck to tow cars to shows or to just get a few Clydesdales. The horses will tow slower but they don’t have to stop and sit at charging stations every 80 miles. I’m thinking that going full Amish might get me to the show field quicker than the truck
 
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