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Selling Tips Needed - Test Drive or Not?

Would You Let Any Potential Buyer Test Drive Your Mopar?

  • Yes

    Votes: 4 36.4%
  • No

    Votes: 7 63.6%

  • Total voters
    11

slepr1

Well-Known Member
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Location
Stoney Creek, Ontario
I'm thinking of selling my 71 Cuda. It's been a long time since I bought a muscle car and need to sharpen up for the sale. I'm curious on what others do when selling their mopars in regards to test drives? I can tell you that in the past when I bought any mopar I never took any of them for a test drive nor was a test drive even offered. I've seen ads for older cars for sale with a line in the description stating "no test pilots". I've always been satisfied if the thing started and didn't spew blue exhaust, but that may have been my buying ignorance. What are your thoughts and suggestions?
 
I wouldn't let a buyer drive my car but I would take him for a ride. What does the buyer lose if he creates a problem? Accident or blows engine because he drives like maniac.
 
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Yes, but would depend on their age, manner etc and I would be sitting in the passenger seat. I'd tell them up front the "rules", just a gentle drive with a quick blast if required.
But how they look, act, what car they arrive in, did they arrive with their wife and family or have they turned up with a fellow gang-member etc would all weigh on my decision.
 
I would take them for a drive in the car first and if they seem genuine then let them behind the wheel.
Never by themselves or if they drive badly.
 
No test pilots without money evident. I sold my GTX on a telephone call.
The new owner didn't drive it until money was in my bank and the ownership had been officially changed.

No longer my car at that point.

SOLD.JPG


There it goes.
 
Take them for a drive. Tons of idiots out there and sometimes they don't look or act like idiots at first.
 
As a seller, depends on the car, trailer queen , he'll no.
Something like my 67 ( a driver ) I would not mind giving a potential buyer a ride if the weather is decent.
( I'm driving )
Then on the flip side if I was looking at a V code X ect , that's show ready just let me hear it run.
A driver quality car, I would ask for a ride.
I want to hear and feel it.
:drinks:
 
As a seller, depends on the car, trailer queen , he'll no.
Something like my 67 ( a driver ) I would not mind giving a potential buyer a ride if the weather is decent.
( I'm driving )
Then on the flip side if I was looking at a V code X ect , that's show ready just let me hear it run.
A driver quality car, I would ask for a ride.
I want to hear and feel it.
:drinks:
I’ve done exactly the same, as both buyer and seller.
 
I would not buy a car that I was not allowed to test drive. I’d be happy w/current owner taking me out then giving me the wheel for the way back. If when I first arrived to see the car and could tell I wasn’t likely going to be the buyer I would not even want to drive it nor waste the owners time. Last time I looked at a 70 Charger for an East Coast FBBO, very serious member - that’s how we handled it. If he wasn’t so serious about the Charger I likely wouldn’t have driven it - Because I seriously advised him against the purchase. He ended up with a stud Charger that has since been posted here a number of times.

For my selling I would need to ascertain how serious the potential buyer was before letting them have the wheel. Not likely Tom, Dick or Harry was going to get the wheel. There would be a fair amount to fact finding chit chat before even taking them out.
 
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I think letting a guy drive it is ok with owner in the passenger seat. Two buddies show up and want to take it? No way. I sold my last two R/Ts with the buyers refusing to drive them because it was raining both times. The seller holds all the cars and dictates the terms of the sale or shove off.
 
I have sold a few of my fleet of old 80's and 90's junkers over the years. Story time!

The first thing I ever sold, was the old 79 f250 farm truck. It was at it's end rust wise, although it looked ok, the bed floor was swiss cheese and every panel had "spots", along with bad valve guides making it hard to start. I had it at the end of my driveway as I wasn't ready to actually advertise it yet, no sign in it. The county guy cutting the ditch grass on a tractor stops to look at it on his way past, asks how much, sold. Never started it for him. He came and picked it up that weekend.

The next thing many years later, was the 1970 mega-heap Mustang. Local guy wanted to hear it run. I did not offer a test drive, it had manual brakes and the top loader 4 speed was really annoying to get out of reverse because the shifter linkage was missing a bushing. He was happy to hear it run, offered like $200 less then what I had in the window, sold.

The third thing is where I decided on how I was going to do things from then on. 1995 F150, was bought for the farm the last year we farmed so it would go on the taxes. 300I6 5 speed. had this for a lot of years, but it was in pretty dang nice shape and had like 90k miles on it. Being the I6, kids didn;t want it. Old guy from the south part of the state comes up to buy it. Wants to test drive it. "Can you drive stick". Sure he says, I drove up here in a stick.
What you need to understand is this truck was a RWD truck, not 4x4, and was an entry level truck we bought with 4k miles on it, because in 95 and 96 Ford was selling these I6 rwd 5 speed "XL" trucks for like half of what the 4x4 XLT was. SO it had a gear box where first gear did 30mph. In a truck. It was fine, the I6 if nothing else was a tractor engine and lived at 400RPM.
Anyway, the guy leaves my driveway(I went along) and it's fine. Get on the highway. Guy proceeds to hold the pedal to the floor in second gear for a mile.
"Pull over"
Why?
I said so, this is my truck. Pull Over. (I am 300lbs of farmer, my voice has.... inflection)
So I turn us around and drive us back home. Guy tells me he just wanted to make sure it wouldn't break down or overheat. I told him this isn;t Milwaukee county this is farm country and people don;t do that **** up here, I wouldn;t sell a lemon to someone.
he bought it, i made him sign a paper saying it was "as is" and I was not liable for anything he did after he left. Then I made him sign my copy too. I wouldn;t have, but I told him if anything happens to it now after the stunt he pulled it's on him. The truck had never gone over 3k RPM until that day. Didn;t need to, 300 I6 is a tractor engine.

After that, no one drives my stuff. I take people for rides. They don;t even go that far unless cash is in their hand. Whiners and tire kickers and people that want to chip at my price by pointing at obvious, or imaginary, flaws are told to get off my property.

You see, even in podunk WI, people are not like they used to be. They will purposefully try to break your ride "to see if it is OK or not". DO you want them to? What if they are idiots and crash the thing? What if they put it into a ditch, sue you for injury and claim the car you were selling as is was defective? Sure it might not hold up in court. Court costs money.

No, people don't drive my stuff anymore. I also don't ask top dollar, and I tell people that and they know it, which is why the tire kickers and price chippers get told to go away.

You aren't a car lot. You don't need to please the customer. It's your stuff until they pay for it.


Make sure to report the car sold to the state if required. Why? So if they try to pull some BS the State knows what happened. That's a recent law in WI, I haven;t sold anything since it went into effect but a friend in town had their car taken out of state to use to run certain things they shouldn't "around town" and it was still in his name. So Next time something goes, I will be reporting it.
 
I’d like to add to this conversation some tools that are essential nowadays. The Dri-Mark pen swipes a yellow mark, if it stays yellow or turns clear the paper is legit. If it turns brown or gray it’s suspect. Then there is a light on the pen to check for the safety/security strip and you can read the denomination. It must be noted $1 have no safety/security strip. Second, thieves are “washing” $5-10-20’s and turning them into $100’s.

The counterfeit detector has a light also that shows the safety/security strips and educates folks like us about the placement of the strips and shows the different colors of each denomination. Frankly important things about money I did not know.

It’s good to have a second person checking and counting while paperwork is being completed. Distractions are a key component of thieves, the pretty wife, kids or whatever. If someone is in a rush then send them packing.

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In case someone is seriously interested and shows proof of funds (maybe a security deposit) i would let him testdrive.
After all i wouldn't want to buy a car without test driving it myself aswell.
 
I’d like to add to this conversation some tools that are essential nowadays. The Dri-Mark pen swipes a yellow mark, if it stays yellow or turns clear the paper is legit. If it turns brown or gray it’s suspect. Then there is a light on the pen to check for the safety/security strip and you can read the denomination. It must be noted $1 have no safety/security strip. Second, thieves are “washing” $5-10-20’s and turning them into $100’s.

The counterfeit detector has a light also that shows the safety/security strips and educates folks like us about the placement of the strips and shows the different colors of each denomination. Frankly important things about money I did not know.

It’s good to have a second person checking and counting while paperwork is being completed. Distractions are a key component of thieves, the pretty wife, kids or whatever. If someone is in a rush then send them packing.

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The $100 bill is the most counterfeited currency in the world. I was in Thailand one time and cruising the streets. I came upon a vendor with some really nice knockoff high end watches - A very recognizable brand. A couple of Middle-eastern dudes were also looking. They opted to buy several each and wanted to pay in $100 bills of which they both had significant wads - but just so they both would have to have been returned the majority of their C notes in Thai Bhat the local currency. I thought it suspicious and the vendor was unsure of taking these bills w/no way to verify their authenticity. Sensing I was American he looked pleadingly at me for a gesture of yay or nay. I was about 99% sure they were fake bills and tried to put a “don’t do it” look on my face the best I could. These two dudes were being pushy and aggressive. It was then I just shook my head and walked off. I felt for the vendor as the Thai are not confrontational people so I’m pretty sure he got screwed. If one is accepting C notes anywhere outside this country better to make damn sure they’re legal tender. And depending from whom you’re getting them from be very careful here as well.
 
I’d like to add to this conversation some tools that are essential nowadays. The Dri-Mark pen swipes a yellow mark, if it stays yellow or turns clear the paper is legit. If it turns brown or gray it’s suspect. Then there is a light on the pen to check for the safety/security strip and you can read the denomination. It must be noted $1 have no safety/security strip. Second, thieves are “washing” $5-10-20’s and turning them into $100’s.

The counterfeit detector has a light also that shows the safety/security strips and educates folks like us about the placement of the strips and shows the different colors of each denomination. Frankly important things about money I did not know.

It’s good to have a second person checking and counting while paperwork is being completed. Distractions are a key component of thieves, the pretty wife, kids or whatever. If someone is in a rush then send them packing.

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Good advice. I just went through this process last weekend. My Ford buddy Scott took his F100 street rod to Spring Carlisle and put it in the car corral. He found a buyer, a 30 something who already owned one. He was asking Scott for info how to best perform the upgrades he'd done on the truck. Then his dad showed up on the scene, offered to do a deal on the truck, cash by 4 pm that day. Scott and I were both thinking, if it's too good to be true, it's probably a scam. Not easy to raise that much cash on short notice, and how many folks have that laying around? We immediately thought scam with counterfeit bills.

Well, it turned out that dad was negotiating a deal to buy a high end '60s Mustang, and already had a cash order in with his credit union. He told the kid it would make sense to sell his truck and buy Scott's for the asking price and the quality of the work that had already been done. I counted the bills while they did the title transfer. And Scott took the kid for a familiarization drive, after the title transfer was complete.
 
I would not buy a car that I was not allowed to test drive. I’d be happy w/current owner taking me out then giving me the wheel for the way back. If when I first arrived to see the car and could tell I wasn’t likely going to be the buyer I would not even want to drive it nor waste the owners time. Last time I looked at a 70 Charger for an East Coast FBBO, very serious member - that’s how we handled it. If he want so serious about the Charger I likely wouldn’t have driven it - Because I seriously advised him against the purchase. He ended up with a stud Charger that has since been posted here a number of times.

For my selling I would need to ascertain how serious the potential buyer was before letting them have the wheel. Not likely Tom, Dick or Harry was going to get the wheel. There would be a fair amount to fact finding chit chat before even taking them out.
With higher end sales, I've done a far amount of fact finding before I even give them my address. As a buyer, I've used the test drive as a negotiating tool on cars priced at top dollar. I didn't test drive my former Hemi car, which was obviously legit, and modestly priced. Seller (FBBO member) drove me, and that was more than adequate. Current owner (FBBO member) bought it sight unseen.
 
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