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What do you know about the engineered steel buildings?

Meep-Meep

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There seems to be a ton of companies that sell those buildings that are often used as shop or garage space. Is anyone here a dealer or work for a company that can give me the inside scoop? Perhaps pricing info too so I can help plan my next move. Even if you put one up on your own property and have some good or bad experience to share. Thanks.
 
meep i can't help much yet but i just bought a month or so ago. waiting for the weather to break to put it up. its around 3300 sq. ft.. i intend on it just for car storage. one thing for sure is the price per sq. ft. is really reasonable. you could not build for a fraction of the cost to buy the kit and put it up. check your zoning bylaws. i had a little gray area there but it came around ok. farm zoning is flexable.
 
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There's a guy based in Florida that just screwed a buddy out of thousands of dollars. I tried to call him but no answer on his cell. He's probably up at his country place in the woods where cell service is spotty.....I'll try and get the name of the chithead for ya. The building sounded good but then when you read the paper work real well, you could see all the things that were not right.
 
I can’t offer any firsthand experience but you might want to look over at shopfloortalk.com They have a forum specific to shops and shop equipment, I didn’t search it but I’d bet the topic has been brought up there before. The magazine Successful Farmer used to run an annual shop issue that had some good info so I’d guess some of the ag websites might be a good resource as well.
 
From what my friends have discovered, do NOT under-estimate the cost of the concrete pad! Without it, the building is nearly useless. Some folks have tagged the price of concrete at about half the price of the building itself, or more.
 
I bought a Carolina Carport brand a couple of years ago.

There are several different styles of construction.

My bro in law went with Metal Structures brand.

Are you talking about the "Galvalume" relatively thin stud and truss construction, or the more traditional steel I beam bolt together girders?
 
x2 on slab.

Mine is slabless dirt floor "pole barn" style and I paid $5K and put up my own $400 end walls and $1200 rollup doors.

Bro's was on slab with ends and doors installed and his was $18K.

Granted mine is 30w x 26 deep and his is 24w x 40 deep.

Metal Structures (or is that systems?) has an interesting enginerring design for the slab and uprights. They drill and pour pilings, embed the uprights, and then pour the slab so it is resting on the pilings.

Mine are just "mobile home" auger type anchors, but they aint going anywhere.
 
U.S Steel Buildings & Butler Engineered Steel Buildings, {I think that was the names anyway, it was 15+ years ago now} both come with engineered drawing for permit the process, if you don't pay the extra cost, you will have to have them drawn other wise by a certified engineer {not Cheap}, it adds to the cost but is a wash in the long run, they both were good at 1 time in Calif., we used both makes many years ago at the Auto dealerships in the Concord & Walnut Creek area, I have no idea if they are still in business, there are way too many business's that have left Calif. all together, because of the cost & permit fees etc. of doing business here... If you want just an enclose/car port & finish the rest your self type deal, There was another company I had used that did some large metal galv. steel frame car ports, not a commercial building, with baked enameled extruded roof sheeting, for my Pops they were 28'w x 42'L x 14'h & a 14'w x 28'L x 9'h lean too, both open sided, for around $8500 total, before I moved to Sonora, very decent product selection & style/engineering, but you had to watch their every move, kind of lame management, I think they are still in business management changed, named Moore Rooms {VersaTube Building Systems} from Jamestown Ca.... Call me I will fill you in on the skimmy...
 
as a professional builder of the past 30 odd years...perhaps i can help a bruther out.

its a given that you want this building for either storage of your car or a garage/shop for the car. Engineered buildings are nice and all but lets look at the big picture :

1. finding a good reputable builder that you trust and you know will get the job done in a timely manner is not the easiest thing to do. we have a bad reputation for the most part and there are a lot of morons out there with a ladder racks on their pick up truck calling themselves contractors. DO SOME RESEARCH....TALK TO YOUR NEIGHBORS AND PEOPLE YOU KNOW THAT HAD WORK DONE RECENTLY......with that out of the way , lets talk about the building itself. :

2.these metal buildings are not easy to heat..( if you plan on heating this) . yes they have draped insulation on the walls and ceiling but lets look at this from a different angle..

3. you'll need a place to hang things....a work bench...a place for compressors (a room )..perhaps a BATHROOM. running water is always nice...and the all important LIGHTING !

4. these buildings were designed to go up fast with no creature comforts. and just like the cars we own...THEY ARE METAL AND WILL RUST IN TIME.( DEPENDING WHERE YOU ARE)

here is my professional opinion should you care to listen :

1. 6 inch pad with radiant heating (tubes in the concrete with glycol in them making heat...this is the way to go....$$$$ in the beginning but better in the long run. )

2. facilities....bathroom and running water.

3. 2x6 wood frame building..(14- 16 feet high to accommodate a lift or 2 )

4.vinyl exterior...drywall abuse board interior 5/8 ( this stuff is hard to hurt)

5. 5/8 white drywall on ceiling

6. 10 foot roll up door

7. windows for natural light

this will make for a much more " comfortable" building than a metal building and the wood frame is alot easier for shelving...hanging....wall lights...ceiling lights...etc...etc... if youre going to spend alot of time in it,,,youll want it to be comfortable...in my opinion a metal building isn't .....and can be built for relatively the same price per sq. ft.....just think of it as your living room with a few cars in it !
 
as a professional builder of the past 30 odd years...perhaps i can help a bruther out.

its a given that you want this building for either storage of your car or a garage/shop for the car. Engineered buildings are nice and all but lets look at the big picture :

1. finding a good reputable builder that you trust and you know will get the job done in a timely manner is not the easiest thing to do. we have a bad reputation for the most part and there are a lot of morons out there with a ladder racks on their pick up truck calling themselves contractors. DO SOME RESEARCH....TALK TO YOUR NEIGHBORS AND PEOPLE YOU KNOW THAT HAD WORK DONE RECENTLY......with that out of the way , lets talk about the building itself. :

2.these metal buildings are not easy to heat..( if you plan on heating this) . yes they have draped insulation on the walls and ceiling but lets look at this from a different angle..

3. you'll need a place to hang things....a work bench...a place for compressors (a room )..perhaps a BATHROOM. running water is always nice...and the all important LIGHTING !

4. these buildings were designed to go up fast with no creature comforts. and just like the cars we own...THEY ARE METAL AND WILL RUST IN TIME.( DEPENDING WHERE YOU ARE)

here is my professional opinion should you care to listen :

1. 6 inch pad with radiant heating (tubes in the concrete with glycol in them making heat...this is the way to go....$$$$ in the beginning but better in the long run. )

2. facilities....bathroom and running water.

3. 2x6 wood frame building..(14- 16 feet high to accommodate a lift or 2 )

4.vinyl exterior...drywall abuse board interior 5/8 ( this stuff is hard to hurt)

5. 5/8 white drywall on ceiling

6. 10 foot roll up door

7. windows for natural light

this will make for a much more " comfortable" building than a metal building and the wood frame is alot easier for shelving...hanging....wall lights...ceiling lights...etc...etc... if youre going to spend alot of time in it,,,youll want it to be comfortable...in my opinion a metal building isn't .....and can be built for relatively the same price per sq. ft.....just think of it as your living room with a few cars in it !

I do care to listen and I thank you for your time! This is no where near happening but if and when it does I want to be armed with some good info. You are correct in assuming that I will spend a lot of time in there, especially with my machinery and so forth, and the heated floor concept is interesting. I will definitely look into wood as an alternative to steel.
 
what i have my clients do is make a floor plan of how they would like their building to lay out. bathroom, slop sink, hose bib compressor room (insulate and vent this room for noise purposes, youll thank me)..wall outlets, 220 lines cieling and wall lights. all of this needs to be "pre-thought-out. give it to the contractor and he will go over it with you..(if he is good). a good contractor will work with you....a bad one will toss the building up and start demanding payment.

i worked on a draw .....that means i divide the building into 4 categories. when one category is complete and you're satisfied, pay the 1st draw....and so on.

this is good for both parties. the contractor gets a steady draw of money...and the client can change things if needed before too much gets built. this system has always worked well for me....and is fair to both parties. be prepared and have your ducks in a row so that things go smoothly. it will be a more pleasurable experience.
 
tpodwdog has many good points:
A "stick" framed building is best in 9 out of 10 measurands.
The metal building is faster to put up and always cheaper?
You need "stand-alone" shelving. Cant dry wall inside easily.
Stick framed adds "more" value to your property.
I suppose, right now, I'd love a stick framed building. A guy down the street has a 1600 sq ft house and he bought the adjacent lot and stick framed a 60 X 30 garage, 10 ft ceilings, stucco and tile roof to match. It looks awesome, blends into the community. (90K I think he paid for it)
In this economy, thats a nice house!
But, I think metal is cheaper. He would not have been able to build it aside his house if it was metal.
 
Yea, Tpodwdog makes some great points on going with a wooden structure. And for as much time as you spend in your shop Meep, you don't want to be in an oven in the summer and an Icebox in the winter.
 
SUPER-BEE-SKI and EVIL MOPARS also bring up good points. blending into the neighborhood is definitely a plus. i have seen where some of you guys live in your pix. nice neighborhoods, and the last thing ya wanna do is piss off your neighbors with a big ugly metal Quonset hut.

these thing DEFINITELY turn into ovens in the summer heat also. they get unbearably hot and cooling them is just as hard and expensive as heating them.

i would never go the metal building route myself. i have been doing this for all too long to see the down side of it. theyre nice if youre going to put your car in it for the winter, but how many of us just do that? We are constantly working on them and thats where the " comfort factor" comes into play !
 
Building in the Bay Area in Calif. isn't like anywere else

Meeps if you need help let me know, I was a general contractor for 25 years, a carpenter & project manager on & off 10 years before that, my Pops also was a general contractor when I was young, I built mostly in your area of Concord, Walnut Creek, Dublin, San Ramon, Oakland, Lafayette, Berkley, Martinez, Antioch, Pittsburgh, Fairfield, Sacramento, 125 dealerships in total through out the western U.S., but none in Danville or Alamo area, before becoming a Golf Pro, I specialized in Automotive Dealerships Construction, Consultation & Maintenance... I would 1st check with the building department that the structure would be erected or built in, find out what type of materials they will allow, you will probably have fire suppression issues & probably need to install a fire sprinklers system & fees, if its anything more than just a carport or basic garage {prepare to get bent over & reamed for that issue} depends on how close a fire dept. &/or hydrant is from your location & were the building is located near or by any type of structures house or commercial property, what type of structures surrounding your planned project., is there any type of power lines or gas lines to deal with overhead & underground, remember your in Calif. & the Bay area it is by far one of the most liberal **** retentive areas in the nation, when it comes to specification, regulations & building Dept's, property set backs & permit fees, Title 24 & handicap accessibility {especially if you add a restroom &/or cooking areas}, Melo-Rouse or water &/or school fees, structure per/ft fees usually around $2+ per./sg.ft. of roof line if single story, then there are egress fees, sewer fees, electrical supply access/fees {PG&E}, possibly trenching fees, cable & telephone hook up & access fees & possibly trenching fees, occupancy permits {if it has a rest room or living area of any kind, earthquake regulations, height & type of structure, possibly environmental impact studies &/or traffic studies, if you don't already have electricity to the property you will need a temporary power pole & supply, plus probably even the color of the structure even, unless it's in a rural area, away from development, these all could be issues for sure... You know how to get a hold of me... Good luck buddy, lots of variables, it's an undertaking for sure, even if you just hire/contract it out, be prepared to spend lot's of time on it or pay dearly for someone to manage the project for you...
 
ok i have started my build

There seems to be a ton of companies that sell those buildings that are often used as shop or garage space. Is anyone here a dealer or work for a company that can give me the inside scoop? Perhaps pricing info too so I can help plan my next move. Even if you put one up on your own property and have some good or bad experience to share. Thanks.

i know its an older thread but here is an update on mine. 32x48x18=1536 sq ft. 22 gauge
price-15000.00 plus applicable tax.

install is to be erected with 10x10 roll up and 1 steel man door. 3 walls with kit and front wall built to suit. 24" footings at 4 ft depth, 8" pored wall to 1 ft above ground level. floor for now, 1ft 3" minus compressed with 6" of 1" crushed clear minus compressed on top. this depth allows for 2" concrete floor at later date. install started monday, 13/08/2012
price-15200.00 plus tax

sub total--30,200.00= 19.66 sq ft

estimated extra's, 60 amp power, minimal lighting, 2" concrete floor, elec door opener. est. price 5000.00

building permit-300.00

real close to finished price, plus/minus 1000.00- 35500.00= 23.11 sq ft

this is to be used for toy storage only. i have cars in storage now in 3 different locations and it is a pain in the *** being on someone else's time frame for access and moving stuff to get yours.

price of having everything under one roof at home; PRICELESS:headbang:

meep about the only variance i could see for you is maybe zoning, i am prime ag, farm which is a little less restrictive, and maybe your location won't require footings at 4 ft depth for frost.

if you are still thinking about it this is what i have into it. rick

p.s. i still have a 100x40x30, 4000 sq ft barn for various parts storage. pic's of construction to follow
 
I have a 24x28 metal building with 12' peak ceiling, 2 10x10 roll up doors and one personel door. I've had it almost ten years and I LIKE it. ALOT. Rather than get in the fray about what's good or not, if you want specifics, PM me.
 
40x60 with 10ft sidewall metal building here. 6" 7000psi concrete/ fiber floor, 16ft roll up door and two walk in doors. Electric and water stubbed up through the floor, and insulated. Total cost was $26,000 two years ago. I have since done all the electrical myself for a little under $1,000, and installed a 5 ton package heat pump and all duct work for a little over $4,000. Lift and plumbing are next on the list, as well as covering the walls inside with plywood. I've also built several feet of work benches and an 10x10 room that will house a urinal. Like I said, I've had mine for two years and I absolutely LOVE it! My a/c had no problem keeping it cool when it was 100*+. Hope this helps!
 
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