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William Post won't be down for his Pop Tart breakfast

Richard Cranium

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William “Bill” Post, who helped create Pop-Tarts, the pantry staple that reinvented breakfast for the masses, has died. He was 96.

“We are deeply saddened to share the news that William ‘Bill’ Post passed away over the weekend,” Pop-Tarts owner Kellanova said in a statement. “He played an important role in co-creating the iconic Pop-Tarts brand and we are grateful to Bill for his legacy and lasting contributions to our company.”

The Michigan man helped create the first toaster pastry for the former Hekman Biscuit Company, which later became Keebler, in the early 1960s. Pop-Tarts, originally called a “Fruit Scone,” came about when a group of Kellogg executives visited the plant that he managed, looking for ideas for a new snack.


“They had, like, a piece of pie, shape of a slice of bread, fork marks around the edge [and] two pieces of dough with some filling in it,” Post recalls in a promotional video about recent visit he made to the factory he worked in. “They said ‘We have this idea. We’d like to put that in a toaster.’”

He took the piece of pie with him and said he “had to break every rule in the book” to create Pop-Tarts. The original test run of 45,000 cases of each flavor (strawberry, blueberry, brown sugar cinnamon and apple-currant), first sold in Cleveland, “blew off the shelves.”

To make it easier to ship, Post thought of freezing them despite concerns they would melt in the toaster when heated (they obviously didn’t). In the following few years, frosting and sprinkles were added and Kellogg created “Milton the Toaster” to be its mascot.

Kellanova, which recently split off from Kellogg, makes 7 million Pop-Tarts a day that generate nearly $1 billion in yearly sales for the company. The breakfast staple, which turns 60 years old this year, recently went viral for being the first “edible mascot” at a college football bowl game.

“Just try anything. There is no idea that’s too crazy,” Post said. “If somebody tells you you can’t do it. Show them you can.”



Post, who served in the Army in occupied Japan before his career, worked in various roles for Keebler and tried to retire at 56. However, he “could not turn down Kellogg’s request to be their consultant” and stayed in the role for another two decades, according to his obituary.

“He was asked to tell the Pop Tart story to young people in countless classrooms and always enjoyed accommodating those requests, giving his testimony of God’s goodness to ‘the son of an immigrant,’ and bringing some of his unending supply of Pop-Tarts with him,” the obit said.

He was also humble about helping create Pop-Tarts. “I assembled an amazing team that developed Kellogg’s concept of a shelf-stable toaster pastry into a fine product that we could bring to market in the span of just four months,” Post said per the obit.

Post leaves behind two children and several grandchildren and great-grandchildren. His wife, Florence, died in 2020.


 
R.I.P. William.
Had many a morning as a kid walking out to catch the bus with your infamous Pop Tarts in hand.
Raspberry being my favorite :thumbsup:

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Many a Pop Tart went down the hatch during my younger days. RIP Bill.Thx for the many snacks over the years….
 
A wonderful story about a wonderful man. By all accounts he had a humble demeanor despite his accomplishments,
never having forgotten about where he came from. His family - and the community around him - have suffered
a great loss - prayers for all of them.

And yeah, make mine one of the original 4 - frosted brown sugar cinammon. I hit a pack up every morning about
3am to get something in me so I can take all the prescriptions behind them:
GUEST_906a56b4-f9ea-4159-9a61-25b0ebd7c080.jpg
(I will also admit there was a couple decades in years past where it was the Strawberry frosted ones, but a
fella needs a little variety every quarter century or so)...
 
RIP Sir

What are the odds that a guy named Post was a food scientist at Kellog's?
 
Post?

Worked for Kellogg?

How ironic.
 
If you watched the "Cereals That Built America"...

It was absolutely brutal what went on between those two.
 
Thanks Bill for the childhood breakfast.

I wonder if he will get a 12' vertical grave?
 
I loved them as a kid, it was a rare treat for me
it was rare in our house to ever even have them
my mom wouldn't buy them, hardly ever

I bought them from time to time
after I was out of the house

my kids had them here & there, as youngsters
not really regularly

'I haven't had a PopTart in probably 30+ years'

RIP Mr. Post
 
We were on a brown sugar cinnamon PT kick a few years ago.

They are so terribly bad for you with almost zero nutritional value...

I always broke off the unfilled, unfrosted edges to save a small amount of highly refined flour starch from getting ingested.

Probably didn't help much, but hey- I made an effort, right?
 
The ONLY flavor I ever ate
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. Although I liked it better when it was the pink frosting without the speckles. R.I.P.
 
That was one of the draw's of the cin/brown sugar- still has smooth frosting.
 
That was one of the draw's of the cin/brown sugar- still has smooth frosting.
From what I've read, those and the Strawberry frosted are their two biggest sellers.
If they ever change the brown sugar/cinnamon ones, I'll stop buying them.
 
Rest In Peace: Deceased Pop-Tarts Inventor Lowered Vertically Into Slot In The Ground

Feb 14, 2024

Article Image





GRAND RAPIDS, MI — Breakfast pastry lovers around the globe held a moment of silence today after news broke that Bill Post, inventor of the Pop-Tart, had passed away at the age of 96. Post's surviving family announced that he would be laid to rest by being lowered vertically into a thin slot in the ground.

"He would've wanted it this way," said gathered loved ones with a mixture of sadness and appreciation for the man who invented the world's foremost pre-made, packaged breakfast food. The touching ceremony followed Post's expressed wish for his remains to be kept warm and toasty below the earth's surface.

"He had such a delicious personality," said one close friend. "Once you got past his crusty exterior and he warmed up to you, he was really sweet. You could always count on him, he was never too flaky. Whenever things got heated, it only made him even better. We're all going to miss the happiness he would bring to our lives every morning he was around."

Post's long-time coworkers agreed with the kind sentiments. "We all made a toast to Bill this morning when we heard the news," said a man who worked closely with Post for years. "Working with him was wonderful. Sometimes he would be a little too hot to handle at first, but after he had time to cool off, he was always enjoyable."

At publishing time, the finishing touches were being made to Posts's custom-made toaster-themed gravestone. Bill Post is survived by his wife, children, and his twin, who remains alive and will be kept in a foil wrapper and saved for later.
 
Rest In Peace: Deceased Pop-Tarts Inventor Lowered Vertically Into Slot In The Ground

Feb 14, 2024

View attachment 1609748




GRAND RAPIDS, MI — Breakfast pastry lovers around the globe held a moment of silence today after news broke that Bill Post, inventor of the Pop-Tart, had passed away at the age of 96. Post's surviving family announced that he would be laid to rest by being lowered vertically into a thin slot in the ground.

"He would've wanted it this way," said gathered loved ones with a mixture of sadness and appreciation for the man who invented the world's foremost pre-made, packaged breakfast food. The touching ceremony followed Post's expressed wish for his remains to be kept warm and toasty below the earth's surface.

"He had such a delicious personality," said one close friend. "Once you got past his crusty exterior and he warmed up to you, he was really sweet. You could always count on him, he was never too flaky. Whenever things got heated, it only made him even better. We're all going to miss the happiness he would bring to our lives every morning he was around."

Post's long-time coworkers agreed with the kind sentiments. "We all made a toast to Bill this morning when we heard the news," said a man who worked closely with Post for years. "Working with him was wonderful. Sometimes he would be a little too hot to handle at first, but after he had time to cool off, he was always enjoyable."

At publishing time, the finishing touches were being made to Posts's custom-made toaster-themed gravestone. Bill Post is survived by his wife, children, and his twin, who remains alive and will be kept in a foil wrapper and saved for later.
Too easy, you Babylon Bee-plagiarising foo', you.... :lol:
 
A guy involved with making pop tarts lived to 96; guess I'll keep eating them...
 
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