• When you click on links to various merchants on this site and make a purchase, this can result in this site earning a commission. Affiliate programs and affiliations include, but are not limited to, the eBay Partner Network.

Do I need an electric fuel pump? 71 Charger 440x6

Jeff Erwin

FBBO Gold Member
FBBO Gold Member
Local time
2:58 PM
Joined
Jun 19, 2021
Messages
264
Reaction score
235
Location
Woodinville, WA
440 6-pack, all in excellent working order. Carbs rebuilt, engine runs like a sewing machine, fires up immediately when started. However, after the car sits for a day or two, it's hard to start the first time, turns over for about 20 seconds then fires and runs. I am suspecting lack of fuel until the fuel pump gets new fuel to the carbs.

Question 1: where did the fuel in the carb bowls go? No leaks anywhere. I have phenol spacers under the carbs so it isn't evaporating. Used to, now the car can sit an hour and fire right up.
Question 2: do I need an electric fuel pump to fill the lines before starting.
 
It would not hurt to add a electric pump. However, it is not hurting anything as is. After sitting for awhile that is normal.
 
Modern fuel evaporates, so it just disappears. Either buy a little chip clicky clack pump to put inline for priming, or a bigger more expensive name brand pump. Or you can even get in tank fuel pumps

My 68 GTX has a tanks in tank, with pump, doesn’t matter temperature, how long it’s sitting. It doesn’t care, turn the key to the run position for a couple seconds, and if it’s been sitting for a while, just like a middle school kid with his first porno, 1 pump and it fires off!

My 78 lil red express truck has a mechanical pump, if I let it sit for more then 2 days, or if it’s cold, there’s a lot of fussing with it
 
Find some good fuel. Mine can sit for months and start right up. Each one just has it's quirks as to how they want to be started...
 
440 6-pack, all in excellent working order. Carbs rebuilt, engine runs like a sewing machine, fires up immediately when started. However, after the car sits for a day or two, it's hard to start the first time, turns over for about 20 seconds then fires and runs. I am suspecting lack of fuel until the fuel pump gets new fuel to the carbs.

Question 1: where did the fuel in the carb bowls go? No leaks anywhere. I have phenol spacers under the carbs so it isn't evaporating. Used to, now the car can sit an hour and fire right up.
Question 2: do I need an electric fuel pump to fill the lines before starting.
Evaporation. It didn't used to happen before the puppy pee gas we have now. It happens with most carbureted vehicles nowadays. Set a cup of gasoline outside your garage and see how fast it goes away.
 
I've been using the non-Ethanol gasoline recently and it does perform better in my carb engine. I still have to pump the accelerator pump at least 3 times to start after it sits a couple days. I noticed yesterday that my car started up faster than I thought after I opened the fuel line and put in a new inline filter. I thought it would grind but the carb got filled pretty fast through the new dry filter.
 
After a "day or two" looking down the carb do you see absolutely no fuel coming from the discharge nozzles while moving the throttle manually with the engine off?
 
The only downside to an electric pump is noise. I think they are almost a necessity these days with tons of camshaft failures and the modern gasoline formulations.
 
If I was racing I would probably need a electric pump and a regulator. The only reason why I would put a electric pump on a street car is to prime the carb after it sets a few days and takes a lot of cranking to start. Then I would put it on a momentary switch. They make little pumps that work perfect for that.
 
The tanks Inc with walbro pump also solved our starving for fuel with slicks on the car and it starts immediately. The pump isn't as loud only running 7 psi. You would have to listen for it. Another car we have a electric pump upstream from the mechanical. I don't remember the brand of pump, but it can be shut off and the mechanical pump will suck through it. It's a good compromise and looks stock up front. Two other of our cars we run the old grinder sounding electric vane pumps. They have been dependable but they are really annoying compared to the walbro. We also have cars with mechanical only pumps and cranking on it to start is just how it is.
 
Just fill the float bowl. Better than messing around with the gas lines and running wires and a switch. Give it a quick check underhood never hurts either.
 
For a hobby car that is left for days, an elec pump is a good idea. I have had one on all my cars over the decades. It is a no brainer in my opinion. Turn the pump on, instant start. None of this cranking for long periods which is bad for the engine. I have used Carter elec pumps, they are the most reliable. The 46XX model can theoretically supply enough pump gas fuel for over 1000 hp. On my current car, I have the pump mounted behind the driver's side rear wheel. It shields the noise & I do not hear the pump. Not all chassis layouts would allow this.
The Carter 4594 pump is good for 95% of street engines.
 
Back in the day, I always had a Carter electric pump installed adjacent to the tank, over the rear end. The purpose was to guarantee fuel supply at drag strip outings or the "not so occasional" street encounter. Pump was only switched on when needed. However, the one thing I included with this setup was a check valve around the pump, so that when the electric pump was not engaged, the mechanical pump had an unhindered suction path. No reason this setup could not be utilized for priming purposes, so you won't be listening to the electric pump all the time, but not impairing operation of the stock mechanical fuel pump.
 
:lol:
1350d918-ab27-4044-a2a7-090e4c0c14c1.89c0e87ce4e1af88542c30bc13abbe0f.jpeg
 
I’ll add this: electric fuel pump wired to key but also an on / off switch is convenient for winter layup. Shut it down and let the carb run out of fuel before letting it sit for a few months. Also a very easy way to drain the fuel tank.

I did this 8 years ago not knowing I’d be letting it sit that long. Recently, I disconnected the fuel line from the carb, ran it into a container and drained all the bad gas. Filled with fresh and she fired right up. No varnish in the bowls, no need for a carb rebuild

We’ve been running our stuff out of fuel for many years … generators, trash pumps,!lawn mowers. I’m convinced that’s why we never make any trips to the man because our junk won’t start
 
Back in the day, I always had a Carter electric pump installed adjacent to the tank, over the rear end. The purpose was to guarantee fuel supply at drag strip outings or the "not so occasional" street encounter. Pump was only switched on when needed. However, the one thing I included with this setup was a check valve around the pump, so that when the electric pump was not engaged, the mechanical pump had an unhindered suction path. No reason this setup could not be utilized for priming purposes, so you won't be listening to the electric pump all the time, but not impairing operation of the stock mechanical fuel pump.
What was the red X for?
 
Auto Transport Service
Back
Top