Soldering Butt Connectors

Electrical & Ignition

  1. Nacho-RT74

    Nacho-RT74 FBBO Gold Member FBBO Gold Member

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    Well, first and as I mentioned in dozen of threads, you don't need to bypass the ammeter but get the best alt as posible per the car load requirement being able to feed at iddle all the needs as possible. Then since you are refurbishing the wiring, will be enough to get it mantenienced, cleaned and run at least a parallel path to the bulkhead between amm and alt and you'll be set. If it was already burnt, could be a diff story, but if is still in good conditions no need for that.

    About soldering wires or crimping... or combo of both.. well, if making it on an area where wire won't move, why worry about it?. Diff stuff could be if the area will flex to the sides. I allways sold wires where is posible and safe and use couple of shrinking tubes to cover it. Just my opinion and never have been in troubles.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2021
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    • Crackedback

      Crackedback Well-Known Member

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      I rarely use solder on butt connectors. I use non-insulated almost exclusively in my kits.

      GOOD and I mean GOOD crimpers are a MUST. the garbage ones in the cheap kits are just that... garbage. I use Klein 1005 crimpers/cutters. Like this with a tooth for the non-insulated connectors. Work great and a solid tool.

      1005_alt1.jpg

      If you want to seal up the joint, use liquid tape on it then cover with multiple layers of shrink tube. Or get adhesive shrink.
       
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      • 72 Satellite

        72 Satellite Well-Known Member

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        I've actually read several of your threads and found a good deal of useful information in them, especially as it relates to the MAD bypass. I've upgraded my Dash Panel and Gauges to aftermarket. I'm essentially doing the same thing as the MAD modification, since I no longer have an Ammeter, but still require the main feed for all of the components.

        I ended up going with Non Insulated Butt Connectors, and 2 layers of high quality Shrink Tubing.

        Including some pics of the Harness before and after cleanup and refurb, along with a pic of the entire dash with new Gauges and Panel. The harness was in real decent shape, minus a couple hacks. Removed old tape, inspected everything, cleaned and burnished all connectors, Deoxit followed by Contact Cleaner and Dielectric grease where necessary, all new fuses.

        20210415_212146_resized.jpg 20210414_191402_resized.jpg 20210414_191528_resized.jpg 20210415_210120_resized.jpg
         
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        • 70chall440

          70chall440 FBBO Gold Member FBBO Gold Member

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          Everyone can do what they feel is right but I almost always crimp and solder. In my mind I want a mechanical grip coupled with a the solder. If done right it takes very little solder(and thus very little time). This includes butt connectors; these have a small hole near the center on one side, if you heat it with the soldering iron and allow the solder to wick in and if you leave just a little exposed wire on both end you will see the solder wick into the wiring which signals you are done. I then cover it with heat shrink for protection.
           
          Last edited: Apr 22, 2021
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          • Nacho-RT74

            Nacho-RT74 FBBO Gold Member FBBO Gold Member

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            Ok, i understand you eliminated the ammeter because the new cluster doesn't have it, but how are you getting the power into the cab? Still throught the bulkhead?
             
          • RJRENTON

            RJRENTON FBBO Gold Member FBBO Gold Member

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            EXCELLENT METHODOLOGY ..... which will yield perfect results.....
            BOB RENTON
             
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            • ckessel

              ckessel Well-Known Member

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              For sure you need a quality crimper or crimpers to do the work. Most of what you find just mash the joint. Find the ones that will curl the connector in. On your solder, find the thinnest you can. I use .040 thick. With less mass to heat up, it melts quicker. Also your gun or iron should be a high wattage. You need the heat to be quick. I use a Weller D650 industrial unit. Or a small butane torch. If your iron or gun is low wattage, like the smaller gun I had, you're going to be there awhile heating things up. This causes too much of your heat to travel away into the wire, as opposed to the joint where you want it and overheats the wire and insulation making it hard and brittle. Especially when you are using 12 ga or higher or multiple wires in one joint. More mass to heat. Others may disagree with me but this works for me.
               
            • Shorthorse

              Shorthorse Well-Known Member

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              Never allow a connection to bare the weight of the wire. Utilize strain relief wherever possible.
               
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              • 72 Satellite

                72 Satellite Well-Known Member

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                Yes, same as described in the MAD process. No traditional connections at the bulkhead, spliced and pulled through the bulkhead.

                ammeterbypass_zpsb24a00b0.jpg
                 
              • 72 Satellite

                72 Satellite Well-Known Member

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                Thank you very much for the detailed reply, exactly what I was experiencing with an undersized gun. Ultimately I used a quality crimper and double insulated the joint. I will test and measure the effectiveness once it's installed and can put a max load on the system, AC etc...
                 
              • ckessel

                ckessel Well-Known Member

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                I have multiple crimpers to use depending on the type of connector. One set I have is from Pertronix. It has multiple dies with it, four different units, that can cover a wide range of connections. Spark plug wires too which comes in handy. The one die for the Packard style connector, our cars plus GM and others, is not always reliable and can crush the terminal. For the Packard style I use the units from Autowire. They are dedicated to the Packard style plus there is a separate one for the larger, 12-10ga, terminal or the ones where you have multiple wires going in. One guy I used to work with told me about Tyco. They are a manufacture of crimping tools, supplies etc. His dad used to work for them. They have dedicated units that are way better but they are massively expensive. Like over a grand just for the Packard type. I don't need it that bad. That one is better for production work. For the soldering, you want to hit it with the heat fast, get it done and get out. Not the slow cooker.
                 
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                • Jeremiah

                  Jeremiah FBBO Gold Member FBBO Gold Member

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                  No soldering for automotive application here. I have never had an issue with properly crimped and weatherproofed crimp connectors as long as there are no installation errors. I typically use non-insulated connectors with no-ox and heat shrink or multiple steps of heat shrink to seal it up. It is important to have the correct tools, wire and quality terminals. All of the old Mopars use Packard and as said above they can be a pain to get right with the incorrect or low quality crimper. My go-to is Weather Pack and I have used Deutsch or Amphenol connectors depending on budget, space constraints and project scope.

                  Q: Where is the one place you almost always find high resistance in a Mopar wiring harness?

                  A: Soldered joint in the dash harness

                  Between the bulkhead, a corroded fuse box and that three way splice in the dash we have our work cut out for us!
                   
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                  • 70chall440

                    70chall440 FBBO Gold Member FBBO Gold Member

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                    I've read many time where some talk about the high resistance of soldered joints, solder being brittle, etc. but I've worked on many cars where wires have slipped right out of terminals, been loose in terminals, etc. so for me, solder is an assurance measure. I think a part of the problem is that some people put far too much solder into/onto a joint which causes problems.

                    I agree that good tools is essential no matter which way you are going to go and this includes a quality soldering station with the right equipment. Even more importance is an understanding of what you are doing and trying to accomplish.
                     
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                    • 1toolguy

                      1toolguy Well-Known Member

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                      Who knew the way I was taught to solder splice wires all those years ago had a name.

                      I have used both methods successfully, typically I'll solder splice 14 gauge or smaller wire and crimp spice anything larger mainly because it can be difficult to twist properly, especially in tight quarters. I always insulate these splices with heat shrink never tape. As for the torch vs. gun debate: I always use a gun because I feel I have better control, I know people that use micro-torches I just prefer not to.
                       
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                      • Nacho-RT74

                        Nacho-RT74 FBBO Gold Member FBBO Gold Member

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                        The run circuit splice into the engine harness is soldered from factory with lead down the tape sooooooo...

                        The charging circuit splice is however electrically soldered. I guess due the wiring thickness.
                         
                      • RJRENTON

                        RJRENTON FBBO Gold Member FBBO Gold Member

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                        HOW do you know this? Or as you state "I guess".... supposition...not facts in evidence. What's the difference between "electrically soldered" and "soldered from factory with lead down the tape sooooooo"... Please explain especially for non-experts...like me.
                        BOB RENTON
                         
                      • Nacho-RT74

                        Nacho-RT74 FBBO Gold Member FBBO Gold Member

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                        Damn... I invented what I saw then.

                        Maybe I'm using wrong therms

                        the run circuit splice down the tape is solded like this

                        images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRNebtTxkMenkimNDa3hvbFwV-NibytZimmrw&usqp=CAU.jpg

                        and the main splice into the charging circuit is like this

                        2_Applikation_TelsoSplice_TS6_022.jpg

                        ( it seems it calls ultrasonic?... nice, my bad... MAD website simply calls it "welded splice" )

                        AND I HAVE CHECKED THAT PERSONALLY, from factory untouched areas of harness
                         
                        Last edited: Apr 24, 2021
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                        • Barry Woodyard

                          Barry Woodyard 426 Woody FBBO Gold Member

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                          The Heat shrink tubes work great. They use low temp melting Solder
                           
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                          • RRDon

                            RRDon Well-Known Member

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                            747Mopar makes a very good point. Soldering is best but only if it's done right, and by that I mean making sure the joint gets hot enough to allow the solder to flow completely thru the connection but not wick up into the connecting wire. It's not too hard to do but you might want to practice it beforehand. The most important thing about making solder connections is to be really careful not to move or wiggle the solder connection while its cooling. Otherwise you get whats called a 'cold joint' that can come apart. Personally I do use those big crimp butt connectors on large joints to hold the cables together but then I also solder them after that to ensure a good electrical connection.
                            All those years working in Aerospace, we had to go to NASA 'Soldering School' for two weeks training. Everything you every want to know and not know about soldering for two freak'n weeks! Talk about boring, after the first day I wanted to poke my eyes out the soldering iron! =8^O
                             
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                            • GTXDAN

                              GTXDAN Active Member

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                              Nice job on the harness and panel. I can tell you that wiring on commercial a/c are all crimped. As a licensed A&P mech for a major airline for 32 yrs no wiring on a/c is soldered. In the USA under FAA regs.
                               
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