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Painting your car by matching it to your 50 year old hood springs???

70ChargerRT

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Did anyone see this car at MCACN? Someone posted this awesome 70 GTX on Facebook and said it scored almost a perfect score, for what? IDK, maybe restoration I’m guessing, I didn’t dig too deep. I just want to talk about the Exterior paint matching. The paint code in reference is 1970 FF4 used on Dodges and Plymouths. The same as my car. I know lighting plays a big role on cars but the color still doesn’t look correct. I wouldn’t think 50 year old hood spring paint would be the best place to get a paint match to achieve a concourse type of restoration but this is what some people claimed the owner matched it up to and as seen in the picture as claimed it does look like he left the original paint on the hood springs and matched the paint to it as some has stated and he wanted to show that in which I think his way of Thinking to achieve the way the paint left the factory is wrong. Was he trying to match 50 year old exterior paint on purpose, a faded look or was he actually thinking that hood spring paint is what the paint look liked when it left the factory? Again I don’t know but they were many people bragging on the car on how great of a job he did with the paint matching compared to the hood springs and I’m setting here thinking to myself, looks like an awesome restoration, I’m just questioning the paint color. Heck IDK. Maybe I’m dead wrong and I’ll Be the first person to eat crow and admit it but I don’t think I’ve ever seen a FF4 in this shade of green in any lighting. If someone had some more pics of it maybe I’d change my mind. I wanted to use BC/CC on my car and still get it close to original as possible for my restomod. For matching I used my firewall where I took my power brake booster off and it looked just like the day it left the factory, not even close to the 50 year old faded hood spring paint on this GTX. I had a bunch of pics for comparison through photobucket but those pics are long gone and this bad pic on the rotisserie is all I have left. I didn’t do paint chip matching from the firewall but instead I tried several paint manufacturers by trying the paint codes. The closest paint match to the firewall was in single stage PPG because of course they still have the original paint formula, the paint was almost dead nuts to a match. The base for CC was almost dead nuts also but when I applied the clear it brought out some of the gold but with BC/CC, especially the PPG custom clear, in certain lighting it looks like all different shades of green which I personally like. If you guys were trying to actually match the original paint what methods would you use in achieving a close as possible color match like they left the factory? Let’s discuss sags in paint and poor gaps in another discussion please lol.

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I’m with you. Hood springs do not seem be the best choice for paint matching. Sun and heat can slowly change the original shade. They are out of the Sun but in some heat from the engine.
why not use the door jamb?
 
I always find a spot of original paint the sun didn't get to and have it matched
 
I would think that the hood hinges wouldn't have faded or discolored too badly seeing how the how was probably closed 90% of it's original life. It is only now at all of the car shows and cruise nights that we all open our hoods. Mine even still match the cars paint color perfectly.
 
Just wondering: isn't the original color on the fender tag?
 
If the OP is talking about matching the paint with a "gun" camera, they need a reasonably flat, roughly 6" square area.

Hood hinge doesn't have that.

That's a really common color.

My advice would be to find a car at a show, that matches your hinge, and ask to have that car color matched.
 
First, color is changed when it's photographed, emailed, posted online or goes through your computer/phone screen. In your picture, that color looks pretty close, maybe a little on the yellow side (I've had parts from 3 cars that color). Paint color varies batch-to-batch a little bit no matter what you do. Paint codes are chiselled in stone.... if your new paint doesn't match, it's either a painter who can't color match, or the old paint used pigments that are no longer available (e.g. bright lead or chromate yellows, oranges, etc.) Sunlight degrades color, but heat does not.
 
Mercedes has a color green that works for F4 in B/C... I’m more of a fan of single stage these days.. color match is a pain but worth it. My deck lid has plenty to work with thankfully. Lighting does play with paint but idk about that one.
 
Yeah I’m thinking anywhere that has been sealed away would be the best place for a match. Any kind of place, even the deck lid I would think would be susceptible to some kind of deterioration or aging especially in 50 years. I just happened to find another pic of my car showing the original FF4 green paint where the door seal window trim was removed or whatever you call it.

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If you would like I could send pics of my deck lid. It would be this evening.
 
The hood springs and any firewall areas are affected by heat more than sun. The best places I have found were under the sill plates, and under the roof rail weather strip. Under the trunk weatherstrip as @dadsbee posted is also an excellent place. The only problem to any of the listed areas is that the camera system doesn't do good because thee is not enough area for the picture. Most good paint suppliers will mix a sample bottle of your color for 10 bucks or less. Most come with a brush made into the cap. You can apply some to the above mentioned areas to see how well it matches. I would rather spend 30, 40, or 50 bucks getting a correct match, than just guessing.
 
I would be leery of matching to hood hinges. Sure they are out of the light, heat may not affect the colour but under hood fumes and smoke would, for sure. And a fifty year old car for sure has had under hood fumes and smoke. There’s lots of great places to match; pull a interior panel, under weatherstripping, up under the dash, etc.
 
It would be an interesting experiment to have paint matched to multiple areas of the car that are considered to be unaltered, and then compare them all.

Luckily for me it's easy: Close Enough, Color Change, Original Paint, and Flat Black are my 4 favorite hues.
 
The hood springs and any firewall areas are affected by heat more than sun. The best places I have found were under the sill plates, and under the roof rail weather strip. Under the trunk weatherstrip as @dadsbee posted is also an excellent place. The only problem to any of the listed areas is that the camera system doesn't do good because thee is not enough area for the picture. Most good paint suppliers will mix a sample bottle of your color for 10 bucks or less. Most come with a brush made into the cap. You can apply some to the above mentioned areas to see how well it matches. I would rather spend 30, 40, or 50 bucks getting a correct match, than just guessing.
this is good advice. Heat does affect the paint's "base" and might yellow it. Why not use a cool place that's also out of the sun?
 
I found an excellent place for the original paint on my GTX back in 1999......under the front windshield rubber.
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