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Paint Gun And Compressor Questions

streetmachine

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I'm new to this and just wanted to hear some thoughts/opinions. Anyways, I'm just wondering what would be a good paint gun or paint guns to use with a compressor like this?

https://www.lowes.com/pd/Kobalt-QUI...e-Electric-Vertical-Air-Compressor/1001014062

What I would be paint is if I could paint a hood, tailgate, or fenders from an older Dodge Truck. I realize I may have to do it a piece at a time. Regarding that I would using a single stage paint to my repairs/touch up. The other thing I would be painting is a frame from the said truck along with the smaller pieces such as the control arms, springs, and such.

Unfortunately, I don't have 220V to my storage building currently and that upgrade is not in the cards for now. So, I'm just wondering what would be suggested regarding a paint gun or compressor? Thank you in advance.
 
Look at the CFM rates for the gun, then look at the CFM output of the air compressor/s, you want the compressor to exceed the gun requirements, the better the compressor output the less it will have to run. In the most basic operation, as long as the compressor exceeds the gun requirements you should be able to paint with it without too much issue.
 
I’m not familiar with that exact compressor, but I have the yellow Dewalt that is shown in the “similar items”. It’s a huge piece of crap.
For a gun, if that’s all you’re going to paint, just get an inexpensive Chinese set. You don’t need a Sata or Develbiss if you’re only doing a few items. I got the three gun set from TCP Global. They are great and I think that the three gun set was around a hundred bucks. Just look after them and keep them clean and they will last a long time.
 
Whatever system you use, be sure to install a water/oil separator. Paint is too expensive to do the job twice because of inline contaminants.
 
Sounds like you going to start exactly what I did last year. I restored my 77' Dodge pickup including painting it in my garage. That compressor should work as you aren't spraying all of the panels at the same time. It will be able to catch up inbetween coats. I have a 220v / 60 Gallon compressor and it was enough to maintain a consistant pressure at the gun. You will absolutely need a water seperator and a filter at the base of the gun. I bought a semi expensive Devilbiss (Proline Series) gun and do not regret it one bit. You can go with the Starting Line Series and save a few bucks, but make sure it has multiple tips. Primer sprays much different that clears or single stage. After using a Harbor Freight gun to do the frame, that piece of junk wasn't going to work well for body paint. Paint products are far to expensive to screw up with a cheap gun. I was about $2000 into material when I was finished with my pickup and that was regular professional grade products.

I started by watching "Paint Society" on YouTube . That guy seriously does a great job of teaching how to spray. I created a paint booth in my garage and went through all of his steps. Patience is key. I sprayed base coat/clear coat and it turned out pretty decent. Wish I spent more time getting the body straight but lessons learned. I'm more than willing to answer questions if you have any.

Here's some pics from last year....Mike

IMG_4093.JPG IMG_4293.JPG IMG_4713.JPG IMG_4990.JPG
 
Looks like that compressor can do 4.5 CFM @ 90 psi but it won't dow too much better at a lower psi. Maybe 5.1 at 40psi, but you would need to get the actual numbers from Lowes/Cobalt. An inexpensive HF Central Pneumatic will require 6 CFM at 40 psi so it looks like you a little short for optimum performance. But, if you are not spraying constantly for any length of time, I would not be afraid of trying it. Worst case is you would have spray pieces so the compressor could catch up. My suggestion would be to try a gun that uses little air and try it spraying water to see how fast it drains the tank and what the recovery time is. Good luck.

IMG_5553.jpg
 
Wow, guess I can't type and do grammar at the same time anymore. Don't jump on me Kern!!!
 
I would look for something that has 8-10 cfm@40psi if your looking to just paint. Air tools are another story. I would also invest in a decent HVLP spray gun. Your primer gun can be a cheaper siphon.
 
That purple HF gun will do fine if your not doing a showcar. Sounds like it may be your first painting expierience. My advice is to get the HF gun, the best compressor you can afford, look up youtube vids on how to set up your spray pattern, buy the cheepest paint you can find( even if its rustoleum enamel & thin it down) and practice...
Good luck, its not an unachievable goal.
 
Whatever you do, do not get a direct drive compressor. They are noisy as hell. Most belt driven are quiet.
 
The guy (Brian) is a school teacher/Phys Ed in the day and paints at night and weekends. He's very in touch with his following if you have any questions.
Watch this vid. I think this is exactly what you're after.
 
Thank you all. The compressor and gun was a starting point. If it would be better to get a better gun then I would do that along with a decent compressor but, my limiting factor is still 120 for now. I see Rural King sells pretty much the same compressors as Northern Tool does. Again thank you. I'll check back in here later. Also, the truck isn't a show car but, I would like it to look nice. It is painted single stage enamel now and the paint from what I understand is 30 years old and starting to age some.
 
IMO....Most of the low cost or inexpensive compressors are single stage designs. Meaning that there is one (1) piston compressing from the air intake filter to the storage tank. The most common type of pump is a two (2) single stage cylinders on a common crankcase. The second common pump is a two stsge design. This design used a large low pressure piston assembly exiting into a smaller high pressure piston assembly with an intercooler connecting the outlet of the first low pressure piston assembly to the inlet of the high pressure piston assembly. This is the most efficient design providing the highest SCFM (Standard Cubic Ft. Minute) rating. This design would be best for high air consumers such as a sand blasting cabinet, a tire changing machine, or a HVLP (High Volume Low Pressure) spraying equipment.
The ABSOLUTE WORST trpe of compressor is a diaphragm operated oiless, direct drive type.....low pressure capabilities and a low volume pump. Belt drive pumps are best but are usually a higher priced installation. Be cautious of the ratings.....The higher the delivery pressure and the SCFM at the operating delivered pressures is the important aspect. Most manufacturers state the max psi and volume but not at the operating or use pressures as the lower pressures will require a higher volume produced by the pump.
It was previously noted...a water seperator is an ABSOLUTELY necessary accessory, on the outlet of the air tank or inlet to the use device. In addition, an ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineering) certified, designed and built storage tank or vessel will insure quality equipment, for the pressure rating equal to 1.5x the design rating. The vessel will also (or should have) a NB (National Board) stamp on the manufacturers build plate, along with the ASME code stamp. These stampings may be required for the owners insurance requirements.......or not....it depends on the individual's piece of mind and local code requirements.
Just my opinion of course.....
BOB RENTON
 
Whatever you do, do not get a direct drive compressor. They are noisy as hell. Most belt driven are quiet.
Totally agree! You want a compressor head that is oil bath if you want it to last for any length of time. Remember, "you get what you pay for".
 
Something else to consider with that small compressor would be finding a used tank (bigger the better) to charge up a day or so before. Once that little compressor starts running while painting it's going to heat up and not keep up. If you have lots of air stored before you start it will help a lot, even with small jobs.
How hard would it be to run some 220? Honestly you'll be a lot happier in the end, spend once and spend smart.
 
The guy (Brian) is a school teacher/Phys Ed in the day and paints at night and weekends. He's very in touch with his following if you have any questions.
Watch this vid. I think this is exactly what you're after.


Being a high school physical education instructor has absolutely nothing to do with selection and use of a compressor and painting equipment. Remember...doing something "on the cheap" usually results in exactly what one pays for.....cheap or less than acceptable results. What does "very in touch with his following" mean?.....is it finished results or his charged costs or skill and ability of the athletes graduating from his classes? Painting is an extremely important technique but all the preparation work (sanding, filling, sanding, etc.), prior to the application of the paint is the most important aspect of the job. The selection and use of the application equipment is important but secondary to the preparation prior to the actual "painting"...... Just my opinion of course..
BOB RENTON
 
Being a high school physical education instructor has absolutely nothing to do with selection and use of a compressor and painting equipment. Remember...doing something "on the cheap" usually results in exactly what one pays for.....cheap or less than acceptable results. What does "very in touch with his following" mean?.....is it finished results or his charged costs or skill and ability of the athletes graduating from his classes? Painting is an extremely important technique but all the preparation work (sanding, filling, sanding, etc.), prior to the application of the paint is the most important aspect of the job. The selection and use of the application equipment is important but secondary to the preparation prior to the actual "painting"...... Just my opinion of course..
BOB RENTON
Bob, I know you mean well. The OP wanted to paint pieces and parts and "that" school teacher IS IN FACT an extremely good painter.
You might want to watch the video before you pass judgement and "In touch" means he is accessible and answers questions.

I highly doubt I can give the OP lessons or equipment recommendations of my 35 years in autobody and painting on FBBO, only tips.

That video/channel "Paint Society" will help him connect the dots without a lot of outlay of cash in a current, today setting.

As a painter myself, I have a cabinet full of guns......no way am I going to make recommendations to purchase a SATAjet 5500 1.3, 1.4...., when half the time I reach past them for an older Techna Copper 1.4, DeVilbiss ProLite.......or 502. However, the 4400 Minijet is fantastic and I use it often. Again, these are not recommendations, just examples.....painters spend a lot of money on guns to go back to one's they have most of the time.

IMO, For air quality....one the coolest innovation's is an air cooling coil. I made my own version for under $50. Auxiliary holding tanks to cool air....don't need em, just a good oil/moisture separator at the end.
 
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